01 Jun

MOGSouth / GatorMOG Regalia – Get it now!!

I got requests for regalia again at the Spring Meet. All sorts of MOGSouth and GatorMOG regalia, as well as Morgan Wings, Scripts, and Cars are available. Simply go to our regalia supplier ‘Fourth Gear LTD’ and get what you want. I doubt you need an excuse, but Father’s Day is coming up.

Here is a link to their web site.    Fourth Gear LTD 

You can see that they provide this regalia service for lots of other British Car Clubs.

MOGSouth has paid to have our club logos digitized and placed into their ‘Car Club Logo’ library.   They also have a library of ‘British Marques’ which includes Morgan wings and  Morgan Script, and a library of ‘British Cars’ include the cowled grill Plus 4 (in either a top up or top down configuration) as well as a Three Wheeler.

If there is an image or logo you want and don’t see let us at MOGSouth know.  If there is sufficient interest, we may be willing to have the image digitized and made available to the membership in the future.

The process is simple.  Go to their web site.  Pick a logo or other image from the libraries and place it in your shopping cart. Then select a regalia item, e.g. shirt, hat or wine tote or whatever and place that item in your shopping cart.   The regalia item price includes the embroidery unless something special is being requested.

As I understand it, they will gladly change colors. What color is your Morgan? They have both top Up and top Down versions of the car. If you have relatively simple requests or ‘special instructions’ to add to your order, there is a ‘Notes’ field you can use to specify your desires.

If there is something complicated that you want like logo size changes or location of the embroidery (e.g. big logos on  the back), use their ‘Request Information’ button to ask questions about your specific needs.  Some things may not be doable with their current equipment.  (FYI, the standard embroidery location is on the left chest of the shirt.)

Also, I believe they have, or will source different regalia items for you, e.g. denim shirts and sweatshirts.  If you don’t see what you want, just ask.

Note –  due to the complexity of the GatorMOG logo there is an additional charge when it is selected.  It also is a bit too big to fit nicely on a cap.   It is also recommended that it go onto a sturdy material to reduce the risk of puckering.

Let me know if you have issues or problems (or just have comments.)

Cheers, Mark

26 May

Sir Morgan’s Knighting (Irene Breland)

As a new owner of what has to be one of the most interesting British marques still in existence, I gladly joined MOGSouth after finding my Morgan last fall. The club covers the southeast and includes several British Car Club of Charleston, SC members. I was determined to attend the Spring Meet and registered early. John Scott and I thought we could gather a few more Morgans from our area but we ended up being the only brave (crazy may be a better word) souls from here to drive a Morgan to Augusta, Georgia during a heat wave!

Sir Morgan – Photo Courtesy Irene Breland

On May 17th John and Laura in their beautiful 1961 Plus 4 and me in my 1966 Plus 4 left Charleston around 10:00 AM headed to hot Augusta. The drive started out quite pleasant with shaded country roads and nice scenery. Did I mention a heat wave? By the time we hit the small town of Williston I was getting nervous watching the temperature gauge, so we made a stop at the local gas station to cool us all down a bit. It’s kind of hard watching things like the speedometer, oil pressure, water temp and oil temp with sweat rolling down your face and hot air swirling around your head! As we were heading out John spied a local store named Morgan’s and started pointing to it. I must say my eyes were still blurry with sweat so I wasn’t sure what he was pointing at till we arrived for a late lunch in Aiken. John’s plan was to stop and take pictures in front of Morgan’s Drug Store on Sunday morning on our way back home.

After a delightful lunch in beautiful downtown Aiken we readied ourselves for the hottest part of the day and aimed for Augusta. That drive was HOT! Thanks to our excellent navigator, Laura, we managed to get through all the turns, traffic and stoplights and land at The Partridge Inn on Walton Way. We parked our Morgans with several others that arrived early enough to have cooled off (owners and cars) and eagerly watched other Morgans and their owners arrive.

MOGSouth put on a really nice reception with some fun snacks like Nuts and Bolts, which were root beer looking life savers and candied pretzel sticks. They had several other stations with other clever names and goodies all relating to driving, cars and car parts. Something we might be able to copy for our upcoming reception!

Saturday was Rally morning and after a 9:00 group picture we were given our instructions, and by 9:30 our Morgans were rumbling to life in our private parking garage. Now that was a cool sound! As we headed out of Augusta and started getting closer to open hills (yep) you could see the long string of Morgans as they climbed up the next hill in front of you. Oh, forgot to say we were headed to Washington, Georgia via the bridge over Clark Hill Lake. Once again, our navigator, Laura, kept us on the right track. With all the turns, traffic and stoplights our caravan did not stay together but we all managed to get to our first pit stop in time to parade downtown Lincolnton to the visitor center where they had a wonderful reception awaiting us. They were so happy to have us they ran a story in the local newspaper announcing our arrival with history and picture!

The Local Lincolnton News Paper – Photo Courtesy of Irene Breland

When we returned to our cars, we each had a copy of the local paper with a Morgan article folded for us to see on our front seats. Now that’s southern hospitality!

We continued on to Washington, Georgia that is, for lunch and touring. There we were parked around the historic town square and were free to roam around what is an interesting small town. There were several options for lunch and snacks and quite a few folks checking out the unusual cars in their town square. Did I mention it was HOT? Some of us toured the local museums and some traveled up the road to see an American car collection.

MOrgan’s Drug Store – Photo Courtesy of Irene Breland

All in all, a pretty neat old southern town that I would recommend going to if close by. I think it’s sad that we all seem to be in such a hurry to get to our destinations that quaint towns with interesting history get left behind with the rush to find the fastest route.

The caravan was quite scattered on the drive back to Augusta. We headed out mid afternoon and it was HOT. The directions back to the hotel were supposed to be a shorter route back but didn’t allow for a freight train to stop us in the middle of nowhere, in the blazing HOT sun! This is where I decided I was crazy! After carefully getting over the railroad tracks, we resumed our journey back to the hotel. I think at that time we were still an hour and a half or so from our destination (lord knows what it was as my brain was fried from the heat). The three very hot cars managed to get through busy Augusta late afternoon traffic and into our cool garage by 5ish. Cocktail hour was looking really good now as was our club dinner!

Sunday morning, early Sunday morning, was our target for heading back to the coast and hopefully cooler temps. We were on the road again by 8:15. We stopped for gas and we stopped for a picture in front of Morgan’s Drug Store in Williston. As we crossed the old Ashley River bridge, we waved goodbye as John and Laura headed downtown and I headed to Mt Pleasant. I pulled into our garage around 12:30 and changed “Morgan’s” name to “Sir Morgan” which I had told him that morning I’d ceremoniously ‘Knight’ him, if he got us both back to Mt. Pleasant!

20 May

2019 MOGSouth Spring Meet – (Augusta GA) 17-19 May

A few years ago, I was in Augusta GA in May and it was very hot.  This year I was again in Augusta, GA in May and it was again very hot.  I may not be too bright (or at least that is what Andrea says?) but twice is good enough for me!  I have concluded Augusta, GA in May is very hot. 

Good thing I took the Morgan with Air Conditioning!!  Yeah, right.  I have a switch and wishful thinking!  I guess that is about all we can ask for.  (Maybe it will be better with the new cars, if and, when they ever get here?)

This year the MOGSouth Spring Meet was hosted by Dorothy and Glenn Moore, and they did a wonderful job!  Everything was delightful and all of the arrangements came off like clockwork.  As you know, this MOGSouth Spring Meet event was really the MOGSouth Fall Meet event from last year, which unfortunately got preempted by Hurricane Florence, so it was rewickered as the Spring Meet.  The necessitated quite a bit of rework and adjustment by everyone involved, but in the end, it all worked.  Again, a great job! 

Everything was thought of. Even reserved spot in the parking garage at the Partridge Inn. Photo Courtesy of Lynn Craig.

The chosen hotel was the Partridge Inn and it was wonderful.  An historic hotel with character and charm, somewhat improved by the efficiency and cleanliness of Hilton.  I do, however, think our crowd over-powered the staff somewhat but it that seems to happen just about everywhere we go.  Collectively, we must be somewhat demanding??  All in all, the hotel staff was extremely courteous, professional and ultimately accommodating.  I heard nothing but good things about the rooms, the restaurant and the glorious roof top bar.  (When the sun went down you could see the lights of downtown Augusta and we even had a full moon both nights we were there!)

The MOGSouth membership turn-out was unexpected!!  (Other clubs may be losing their members but we certainly aren’t!)  We had a lots of folks we haven’t seen in eons.  And we had Morgans!  4/4s, Plus 4s, Plus 8s, Roadsters and Aero 8s.  The only thing missing were the purple squirrels.  Unfortunately, we had no Drop Head Coupes or vintage three Wheelers.  There were reports of the blue Graeme Addie M3W but I didn’t get a chance to see it.  Not sure what it was that brought everyone out for this meet, perhaps it was the ‘wonderful (?)’ weather in Augusta in May??   Did I mention it was very hot in Augusta in May?

Morgans from everywhere. In the garage in Augusta. Photo Courtesy of Lynn Craig.

This week was one of anticipation, for me at least.  I was feeling a bit house bound and needed a good Morgan trip.  Andrea and I started out, alone this time, with no one else to convoy with.  The Frazees were unavailable, the Bernaths had an ill timed automotive failure, the Stanleys were off RV’ing in middle earth, and so on.  Not a problem, we had the GPS and anticipated hours of scintillating conversation.  Travelling up I-95 is always great fun, and with a stint of I-16 thrown in, wow!!  And, as expected, it was boring, repetitive, and uneventful.  We eventually got to the Partridge Inn and after a quick hello in the ‘Cigar Bar’ (hospitality suite) we checked in and washed up for dinner.  Dorothy had welcoming gifts for everyone. A lovely metal wine cooler (floral vase?) with Morgan Car Club emblazened on the front and filled with all sorts of cookies, caramel corn, etc. Very thoughtful!

Friday evening was one of reacquainting ourselves with the in and outs of everyone else’s lives and a dinner in the hotel’s restaurant.  Nothing too special and early to bed.  Our room was fine. The only complaint we had was an overly active air conditioner.  Andrea tried adjusting it, and I just pulled the blankets up.  Did I mention it was very hot in Augusta in May?

Following breakfast on Saturday morning, a group photo was planned and I wanted to look my best, you know ‘bright eyed and bushy tailed’ . . . well, I tried, but alas, we can only do what we can do!  After the photo, we were off, as a group in our Morgans, roaring up the hill (marching to the sound of gun fire?) to see the wonders of north Augusta.  A good run, with minimal traffic and some good twisty bits.  Lincolnton was the first stop.  Lincolnton is a little town northwest of Augusta and it seemed the whole town came out to welcome us! We stopped for a nature break at the Visitor’s Center and we were greeted with iced lemonade, homemade cakes and cookies, and all sorts of other edible wonders.  Amazing hospitality on a Saturday morning.  It was difficult to pull ourselves away but we did, eventually, and headed up the road to Washington GA.  We even had a police escort out of town! 

Oh, the temptation!! I resisted of course! Photo Courtesy of Lynn Craig.

Washington is another wonderful village just northwest of Augusta.  Getting there was good fun in the Morgan.  Interesting farms, rural property and historic estates were everywhere.  It was really a bit difficult to concentrate on driving with so much to see.  When we arrived in Washington, there was reserved parking for Morgans on the town square.  We parked, stretched and chatted some.  Then we all found lunch in one of the cafes along the peripheral of the square.  I had a flat bread / pizza sort of thing but is was way too big.  It seemed I was more thirsty than hungry (too many cookies in Lincolnton?) and drank a half dozen glasses of water. 

There were opportunities to visit a few local museums and a private car collection after lunch, but I was ready for a nap so we just headed back to the hotel.  The GPS worked for us, once again.  I wonder what we all did before these things??  

Followed directions or read maps . . . oooh, how archaic! 

Saturday dinner was a short drive from the hotel.  Cucina 503.  A well thought out menu with Italian(esce?) offerings.  It was quite tasty and I heard no complaints.  Well, except about the ‘balsamic vinegar’ butter?  A bit odd and I am not sure it really works?

A moment or two of club business, we celebrated a few birthdays and I paid up on my debt (I lost a bet!) to Pat Buckley.  Then it was back to the roof top bar at the Partridge Inn.  Sunday morning came too early and those of us that milled around the restaurant trying to look awake said our goodbyes and then got back on the road. 

A great MOGSouth event.  Lots of fun, lots of folks and everything worked as intended.  Dorothy and Glenn were marvelous.  As has been said many times, but it is really true, it is the people, the volunteers that make MOGSouth a different sort, but an ultimately appealing car club.

A big thanks to Glenn and Dorothy Moore for being our hosts! Also, for everyone who attended. Thank you! I hope to see everyone again very soon, at the 2019 MOGSouth Fall Meet in Pinehurst, NC. Cheers, Mark

[There will be a photo gallery posted when I get my act together. It will take a few days so watch for the email notice! Mark]

List of Attendees

  • Glenn & Dorothy Moore
  • Austin & Jinny Britton
  • Jack & Pat Zimmerman
  • Don & Madeline Moodie
  • John & Laura Scott
  • Richard & Janet Ihns
  • David & Sarah Chiles
  • Brian & Rosie Miller
  • Pat & Judy Buckley
  • Andy & Anne Leo
  • Dwight Kinzer
  • Lee & Trisha Gaskins
  • Mark & Andrea Braunstein
  • Irene Berland
  • Lance & Connie Lipscomb
  • Tom & Kathy Coryn
  • Dick & Betsy Beaver
  • Julie & Lynn Craig
  • Stacey Schepens
  • Jenny Addie
  • Emma & Brian Slater
  • Cyril Brown
  • John Bigler
  • Fred & Gay Hollinger
  • Dave & Marilyn Bondon
07 May

Invitation to the Hilton Head Island Car Club Showcase – 2 Nov 2019

[This is a great event! We participated, as a club, a few years ago, and all had a great time. This year, the timing fits nicely between the MOGSouth Fall Meet in September and the MOGSouth Holiday Party in December. A lovely venue and some wonderful cars. Mark]

We are pleased to invite your Car Club, Morgan Owners Group – South (MOGSouth), to participate in the 2019 Hilton Head Island Motoring Festival’s Car Club Showcase to be held on Saturday, November 2, 2019. Your Club may bring up to 5 cars

[If you want to participate, send an email to mogsouth@yahoo.com (Mark) and let him know. He will send you instructions on how to register your car for the event. They have a online system. ]

This year’s Motoring Festival will again be at the beautiful Port Royal Golf Club on Hilton Head Island. You will be pleased with this first-class venue and the events planned for this 18th Annual Motoring Festival. More details are available on our website at: http://www.hhiconcours.com.

Here are some key things that make this year’s showcase special:

  • British Cars, including American Powered English Cars, will be the feature on Saturday.
  • In addition to the British Cars, the Mercedes Benz Club of America will be holding an event within our event and they promise to tell a most interesting story.
  • An excellent awards line-up will continue again this year, including the Crescent Awards and several additional special awards.
  • The Aero Expo will once again this year feature vintage aircraft, to be held on Saturday only at the nearby Hilton Head Island Airport.  Shuttles are provided so that you can visit this event all day Saturday.
  • The Exhibitor’s Lounge – A tent on the showfield for your convenience throughout the day on Saturday for coffee and pastries in the morning, cold drinks throughout the day, and a great place to view the Awards Ceremony at the end of the day.

Clubs planning to participate should note:

  • Our online registration process, the same as in prior years, is available now for your members to register their cars individually at www.register.hhiconcours.com.  Register using the CAR CLUB SHOWCASE option.  There is a $40 Registration Fee which must be paid when vehicles are registered. This registration fee has been increased for the first time in 15 years due to increased costs and awards over the years. Please note that each registrant receives two two-day tickets, a minimum $180 value.

Please let our Exhibitor Concierge, Meredith Kronz, know as soon as possible (no later than June 1st) the number of vehicles (and their owners’ names) that your club plans to enter.  Meredith can be reached at mkronz@hhiconcours.com or (843) 785-7469, ext. 4. Note that registration is now open, so your member car owners can register as individual exhibitors.

The Car Club Showcase Team is looking forward to seeing you and your Club at this year’s Car Club Showcase.  If you have any questions or if we can be otherwise helpful, please contact Meredith Kronz, the Exhibitor Concierge, at the Motoring Festival Office: (843) 785-7469 ext. 4.

Sincerely,

Michael Dyrenfurth, mjd27rod@gmail.com,
Manager, Car Club Showcase

Jim Ogden, jogden@mail.com,
Co-Chairman, Car Club Showcase        

Meredith Kronz, mkronz@hhiconcours.com ,
Exhibitor Concierge

          

                                                 

01 May

2019 MOGSouth Spring Meet – Saturday dinner at Cucina 503 – Menu Updates

Folks, the Saturday dinner at Cucina 503 (502 Fury’s Ferry Rd Suite 503, Augusta GA. 762-994-0142, www.503cucina.com) has been so well received that we have had to change the menu slightly.

It is still casual dress, still at 6:30 PM, but now the menu has been limited for us. Nothing else has changed.

Menu for Sat May 18, 2019 

Cucina Salad – mixed baby greens, cucumber, shaved carrots, radish, cherry tomatoes, red onion,  grated parmesan, and red wine vinaigrette 

Choice of Entrees:

  • Shrimp Risotto – house made risotto, domestic shrimp, smoked cherry tomatoes  
  • Lasagna Rustica – lasagna pasta,  bolognese, ricotta cheese, parmesan, buffalo mozzarella, crispy prosciutto 
  • Roasted Chicken & Wild Mushroom Pappardelle -pappardelle pasta,   wild mushroom, roasted chicken, white wine garlic cream sauce, truffle oil 

Dessert – Flourless Chocolate cake 

$35.00 per person not including drinks, tax and gratuity…but still separate checks 

30 Apr

2019 GatorMOG Spring Noggin’ – Event Report

The Panhandle British Car Association’s All British Car Show – April 27th 2019 (GatorMOG’s Spring Noggin)

In this age of plastic simplicity, push button ease and instant satisfaction I find I am drawn to the less than optimal, fiddly to make work, greasy beasts of the past.  I just smile when they run. 

Start them up with a bit of this and that, then a bark with a gurgle and a wiggle, and a shot of soot out the back and it’s going.  Good stuff and I smile.  My expectations are different for the older things.  Certainty is not a given, and not really an expectation.  Something I fear is lost on the young. 

Pensacola looms large.  An event where the last count of Morgans was a big number.  (We were hoping for 8 three wheelers!)  Some of the old, some of the new, and lots in between.  It’s was hyped as a GatorMOG activity but, in fact, many of the attendees came from locations across the MOGSouth region, many from outside of Florida.  (Lance and Connie Lipscomb, Dwight Kinser, Bob Steele, Tony McLaughlin, Brian and Rosie Miller, etc.) 

We traveled up from Orlando on Thursday with a plan to stop a few hours shy of Pensacola.  We could have made it in one day, but why?  We had the time, and I don’t want to drive all day.  And, if I do, I am pretty useless the next day (and, I wanted to be functional on Friday.)  Then an early departure with the promise of a morning arrival in Pensacola on Friday.  The 1934 Super Sports three wheeler is in the trailer and I am using the new tow vehicle, the 2018 F-150 truck, to pull the thing.  Modern machinery enabling old machinery. 

We have Ian and Barbara Shelmerdine in our truck as well.  It has a crew cab, not the ‘super’ crew cab, so only occasional seats.  So, this is one of those occasions.  Good thing Ian and Barbara are not too tall.  These seats are just ok, and preferable for a short trip.  Oh well, it was the best we could do.   

The new trailer tow vehicle works as expected, and it tows well.  I fixed the source of the erroneous messages I had been getting on previous hauls ‘trailer disconnected’ and the like.  The trailer-to-truck umbilical cord had gotten frayed and laid bare a wire or two.  When I hauled the F Super project car to Fred Veenshoten’s home, a few months back, we found the problem and corrected it.  All good now!!

Our arrival on Friday provided us with enough time to check into the hotel (the Pensacola Grand Hotel) and get in line for the tour of the Naval Aviation Museum on Friday afternoon. 

The designated car show hotel was the Pensacola Grand Hotel.  The hotel lobby, bar and restaurant, reception area was what used to be Pensacola’s train station.  Very cool!  It had character and patina, and maybe wasn’t as Grand as it used to be, but lots better than a modern, non-descript hotel along the highway.  And, it was just a block or so away from the show field and had a large parking lot for the trailers.  It worked out perfectly for our travelling bunch. 

The Grand Hotel. Photo Courtesy of Karen Bernath

What can I say about the Naval Aviation Museum.  It was awesome!!  Well, that is, of course, if you like aviation stuff.  It started with a trolley ride around the outside aircraft displays.  They have a good number of unrestored or more recent aircraft outside on the tarmac.  The trolley bus tour had a tour guide who provided commentary about the various displays and doubled as the bus driver.  The tour took us about an hour.  Then back inside the Museum we had a guided tour of a lot of the displays and vignettes, early aviation experiments, and world war one biplanes.  Lovely stuff.  Then more modern, World War II fighter planes, Navy stuff specifically, Dauntless, Marauders, Warhawks, etc.  A few flying boats and patrol aircraft but all the planes seemed to have been flown by the Navy??  Well, I guess it was a ‘Naval’ museum after all!!  And, in my opinion (regardless of the Navy bit) well worth the trip to Pensacola! 

WWI Naval Ambulance. Photo Courtesy of Andrea Braunstein
F4 Corsair.  Photo Courtesy of Andrea Braunstein
Ford Tri Motor. Photo Courtesy of Andrea Braunstein
The Pub at the Museum.  A recreation of an actual club. Photo Courtesy of Andrea Braunstein

On Friday night the local All British Car Association, our host of the show, had their ‘Meet and Greet’ at the Pensacola Museum of Commerce.  The show turned the Museum of Commerce into a wonderful reception hall and had a full buffet dinner to keep us all happy.  And, we had a blast.  I’d guess some 100 folks or more attended the Meet and Greet. The Museum was a treasure trove of neat things to look at and perfect spot for the meet and greet.  It was close, we actually walked to it from the Hotel! 

Folks from the local club all came with their hot plates, slow cookers and chaffing dishes full of tasty things and fed us until we couldn’t eat any more.  Beer and wine, as well as soft drinks were on ice.  Even some lovely desserts were provided.  (I know, my diet!)   The hospitality of the Pensacola club has to be commended and we certainly hope we can reciprocate, in kind, should they come our way!

The Meet and Greet.  Nicely Done!  Photo Courtesy of Karen Bernath

Back to the hotel and into bed.  It was late (well, not really, but we’re old . . .)  The show was on Saturday after a breakfast buffet of sorts, we headed to the show field.  A convoy of Morgans.  Five Morgan three wheelers, and a few more Morgans cars.  It wasn’t far, really just strait down the road about a half of mile.  We did make an impression, however.  Pensacola hadn’t seen that many Morgans . . . ever.  They had two classes for Morgans.  A three wheeler class and a (go on and guess!!) a four wheeler class.  We had 6 three wheelers.  4 Old and 2 new.  We had hoped for another vintage three wheeler but heard there was a family crisis.  The three wheelers out-numbered the four wheelers for a while, but then things changed.

The Morgan Three Wheeler Display.  6 Cars. Wow!  Photo Courtesy of Andrea Braunstein

The locals arrived and a few more cars from other places showed up and we ended up with 8 four wheelers.  A local Morganeer was hoping to finish sorting his Plus 4 but didn’t get there.  Still a tremendous showing of Morgans!  And, all but one of the 14 Morgans on the field were piloted by MOGSouth members!!

We found lunch right next to the show venue in a nice café adjacent to the park.  There were lots of animals about as well.  I saw a Humane Society truck go by and I was told that the show venue was also part of a ‘Paws in the Park’ event hosted by the Pensacola Humane Society.  The weather was great and the dogs didn’t disrupt a thing, certainly not our car show.   

Big congratulations go to Rick and Sam Frazee, Lance and Connie Lipscomb and Andrea and I as awardees in the Morgan Three Wheeler Class.  Larry Erd with his lovely S2 4/4 took 1st Place in the Four Wheeler Class.  Fred Fink’s two tone was Second.  All MOGSouth Members!!!

Tom Schmidt, as Pensacola local, won the third place trophy but he wasn’t there with the car.  I guess he had another car in the show?  Not sure. 

Larry Erd’s Award Winning 4/4.  Photo Courtesy of Andrea Braunstein

We tried valiantly to have a group gathering after the show, but it was not to be.  Finding a watering hole on Saturday night was almost impossible.  We didn’t realize it, but it was not only ‘date’ night, but it was ‘prom’ night and every eatery in town was overloaded.  Even our hotel was a mess with a ‘wedding reception’ for a very, very large wedding.  Crowded!!   

Parking at the hotel (during a wedding reception) was at a premium, even with it’s large open lots.  It seemed that every available spot was used.  I couldn’t even put my car back into my trailer after the show as someone had parked in front of it.  I was at least able to park the trike in the lot, but not in the trailer.  So, I put the tonneau cover on it and walked away, best I could do. 

Then we were on the hunt for a beer (and dinner).  It was a long and dry hunt.  We almost went to bed hungry.  One spot we tried, had some 200 (or more) folks in two separate lines falling out the door and covering both sides of the building.  Wow!  I don’t have that kind of patience.  I just don’t know how they managed??

Another place wanted us to wait about an hour and a half hour for a table and then, who knows what for service?  They said they were under staffed?  After a lot of going left, then right, we finally found a table at a Carabbas restaurant, with only a 15 minute wait.  And, of course by then we had lost most of the Morgan group.  We ate at two different tables in two different groups.  Better than nothing.  Then back to the hotel.  It was an early night.  We were all pretty beat and a few of us were suffering with the start of a cold or allergies or something. 

Karen Bernath relaxing after the show. Photo Courtesy of Andrea Braunstein

We were lazy on Sunday morning.  We had a plan to leave at 9 AM but finally got under way closer to 10 AM.  We really weren’t in too much of a hurry.  We just had to get down the road to Gainesville, FL.  A hot shower and then something to eat at the Hotel’s restaurant.  I dawdled some.  I still had to get my car back into the trailer and wasn’t convinced that the parking lot issue would have been resolved.  I envisioned a late night for those attending the wedding reception dinner.  As I was poking around in the parking lot the guy that had parked in my way finally moved his car.  He was pretty much oblivious to the problem he caused. 

I didn’t waste too much time and quickly loaded the car into the trailer.  I hooked the trailer to the truck and was soon ready to roll.  Rick Frazee had both his and John Stanley’s car in his trailer and we added John, in his Roadster, to our convoy and headed south. 

The hotel in Gainesville was a Doubletree (quite nice) and we didn’t get there any too soon. I really was ready to stop. I needed a beer and rest from the road.  Driving the trailer is not too difficult but it is a bit more stressful than just driving.  It took me a while to stop vibrating (a couple of beers, if I remember correctly . . .)

It was a really good weekend and a worthwhile show.  Only down side was the distance.  Pensacola, albeit still in Florida, is still a good ways away from most places.  And, to add to this distance problem was the route. Well, at least the one we took. It is boring!  I-10 across the panhandle of Florida is definitely not a Morgan road.  Straight and boring, mile after mile, with nary a sign of life.  Still it was well worth the trip.  Maybe next time, I won’t take a trailer!!

[Be sure to check out all the other photographs taken at the Museum and during the show.  There were too many to include is this report so a Photo Gallery was created and posted to the MOGSouth Website.  Enjoy!!  Mark]

30 Apr

2019 MOGSouth Spring Meet – Augusta GA, 17 -19 May (Update!!)

Greetings!! The MOGSouth Spring Meet will be headquartered at The Partridge Inn, Augusta GA, 17-19 May, 2019. (2110 Walton Way, Augusta GA 30904, 706-737-8888 )

Modern convenience meets historic charm in this renovated inn that dates to 1910.  It’s a favorite of golf greats Paul Azinger and Curtis Strange.

Please make certain you have packed your MOGSouth Club name tags

Friday May 17, 2019                                        

Arrival – Registration/Check in 3 pm,  Complimentary Reserved Parking in covered, lower level of Parking Garage – receive breakfast vouchers for Saturday and Sunday mornings

Hospitality Room opens at 3:00 pm – The Cigar Bar– but no smoking allowed!!!

  • Due to Partridge Inn restrictions we will have a bartender and cash bar, a selection of 5 beers, House wines, plus water and soft drinks.

Dinner is on your own at The Partridge Inn or out and about at a restaurant of your choice.  You may call the Partridge Inn and make a reservation for Friday night dinner before your arrival.  They do take walk-ins if you choose to make your decision on arrival.

Some Dinner Options (If not choosing to drive, book the Hotel shuttle for going out in the evening.)

  • Partridge Inn Bar and Grille with live local Jazz (second floor & veranda)
  • Raes Coastal Café (Extensive Menu), 3208 W Wimbledon Dr, 706-738-1313
    • Crab cakes from the Outer Banks of NC and shrimp and grits from SC Low Country
    • Popular restaurant, Manager recommends coming as close to 5:30 as possible for good service
  • Finch and Fifth Charcuterie (Americana Bistro) 5 mins away, 397 Highland Ave., 706-364-5300
  • Ephesus Restaurant (Mediterranean) 13 minutes 5 miles, 3102 Washington Rd., 762-994-0180
  • Whiskey Bar Kitchen (Japanese & Burgers) 11 minutes 2.57 miles, 108 Broad St., 706-814-6159
  • Edgars Grille (Fried green tomatoes, fig salad and filet mignon) 14 mins, 4.99 miles, 3165 Washington Rd., 706-854-4700

Friday Evening Options

  • Partridge Inn – Cigar Bar open until 10 pm
  • Partridge Inn – Roof Top Lounge opens at 5 pm, open until 10 pm

Saturday May 18, 2019

Breakfast – 6-10 am, included with your room. $12.99 if not a guest at the Inn

Morgan Drive

  • 9:15 amGather on the front side steps for a group photo  and  pick up car rally directions before going to your Morgans
  • 9:30 am – Depart for Washington, GA our destination  via  the bridge over Clark Hill Lake and through Lincolnton, GA
  • 10:30Rest stop in Lincolnton, rest rooms and coffee
  • 11:15 – Lunch in Washington, GA
  • 12:15 – 1:30 pm or as late as you want to stay.
    • James Jones Auto Museum
  • 12:15 – 2:00 pm if not going to Auto Museum
    • Stay and see Historic Washington’s museums, the Historical Museum is recommended if you have time for only 1 museum visit….or just drive and/or walk and shop in the town
  • 2:00 pm Drive back to the Partridge Inn.
    • You may choose to drive back at your leisure but be at Cucina by 6:30 PM
  • Cigar Bar opens  at 3:00 pm

Saturday Evening

Dinner at Cucina 503 (502 Fury’s Ferry Road Suite 503 ) @ 6:30 pm

  • private dining room, full menu, separate checks
  • if not driving please book the shuttle (762-994-0142) in advance
  • 18 minutes from the Inn; about 7.5 miles

Saturday Evening Options

  • Partridge Inn – Cigar Bar open until 10 pm
  • Partridge Inn – Roof Top Lounge opens at 5 pm, open until 10 pm

Sunday May 19, 2019

  • Breakfast from 6 am – 10am, included with room, $12.99 if not a guest at the Inn
  • 2019 MOGSouth Spring Meet is Adjourned (FYI, check-out time is 11:00 am)
    • You dont have to leave. Augusta is great! Stay and see Augusta’s Broad Street downtown, Ride the Canal Boats or walk the Riverwalk. There is the SouthStar Trolley Tour or get lunch at WifeSaver (414 E Martintown Rd, North Augusta).   This restaurant catered the Masters. It is famous for pimento cheese sandwiches.

Safe Driving…See you in Augusta!!

And in case you need it or have questions, Dorothy and Glenn Moore cell: 404-630-4236

24 Apr

How To Tow a Car Trailer (Ernst – WWW.Hemmings.Com)

[I was surfing the web and found this. It caught my eye as I am trailering one of my Morgans, this coming weekend, to Pensacola for their all British Car Show. Lately I find I am driving less and trailering more. Especially with the older cars or for car events farther afield. Maybe it’s the creature comforts offered by the tow vehicle, or I may just be getting old. (I don’t like the second option so I’ll go with the first!) I have a car trailer and have some experience however I don’t want to become over confident or complacent with something this critical. So, give it quick read and perhaps you will learn something new, as I did. The last thing we need it an accident or worse yet, an injury. Be safe but have fun! Mark.]

Hemmings’s own tow rig, used to transport cars to events. Photos by the author.

According to statistics compiled by the DangerousTrailers.org web sitee, an average of 68,358 American motorists are involved in towing-related accidents each year, each resulting in average damages exceeding $43,000. While towing a trailer seems simple enough, proper equipment, safety practices and loading techniques are all essential components in ensuring that trailering drivers get from point A to point B with vehicles, passengers and equipment intact.

The first step to towing any kind of trailer is ensuring that both trailer and tow vehicle are properly rated for the load to be carried. Should the proposed tow vehicle be rated by the manufacturer to safely tow up to 5,000 pounds, pulling a double-axle car trailer, loaded with a 1961 Chevrolet Impala, across Colorado’s Independence Pass certainly isn’t recommended. The best advice here is “buy enough truck,” understanding that new towing requirements may require the purchase of a different tow vehicle with a higher weight rating.

A proper hitch and receiver are the next essential components, and for towing a vehicle the absolute minimum recommended would be a Class III hitch and receiver, rated at a maximum trailer weight of 6,000 pounds (when used with a weight carrying hitch) or 10,000 pounds (when used with a weight distributing hitch). A Class IV hitch and receiver gets a higher rating (up to 14,000 pounds, when used with a weight distributing hitch setup), but may not be applicable for tow vehicles aside from full-size pickups and SUVs. Beyond this lies Class V hitches (rated up to 17,000 pounds with weight-distributing hitches) and fifth-wheel hitches, which are primarily the domain of heavy-duty pickups.

Once satisfied with tow vehicle and hitch setup, the next challenge becomes finding a suitable trailer to handle your perceived vehicle hauling needs. If your towing is limited to hauling a Formula Vee racer to regional vintage events, a double-axle enclosed trailer will likely be overkill in terms of both size and weight. On the other hand, when towing a Mercedes-Benz Unimog cross-country, a two-wheel car dolly may be suboptimal for your needs. When purchasing a trailer, try to consider both current and future needs; if your passion is for restoring Corvairs, then sizing a trailer may be fairly simple. Should your passion extend to all GM products, including pickups, sizing a trailer may be more of a challenge.

An adjustable height Class V receiver.

For hauling vehicles, trailers should be equipped with a weight distributing hitch and trailer brakes (which may or may not be required by the state in which you reside). An anti-sway system may be a wise investment as well, particularly for those new to towing. Sway likely represents the biggest danger to towing trailers, and it can be caused by factors as diverse as excessive speed, strong crosswinds, passing trucks or improper trailer loading.

To minimize the risk of sway, loads should ideally be centered over the trailer’s axles, evenly balanced from side to side. This isn’t always possible, so most recommend carrying slightly more weight to the front of trailer (assuming that the rig’s tongue weight isn’t exceeded in doing so). Under all circumstances, avoid placing the heaviest part of the load to the rear of the trailer’s axle, as doing so will increase the likelihood of trailer sway.

If a trailer begins to sway, the best corrective action is to gently let off the accelerator, slowing (without applying the tow vehicle brakes) until the trailer is again under control. Should you have an electronic trailer brake controller, applying the trailer brakes manually will bring a swaying trailer under control, which is further justification for an electronic trailer brake and controller setup. Accelerating further or braking the tow vehicle heavily are likely to exacerbate the problem, so both should be avoided. Be aware that certain situations (crossing bridges or being passed by tractor-trailers, for example) are likely to create cross winds; be aware that this make increase the chances of trailer sway, and be prepared to act accordingly.

Emergency trailer brake controller; should the cable pull tight, the trailer’s electric brakes activate.

Ensuring that trailer and tow vehicle are level will also help to minimize the risk of sway, and different trailers may require the use of different height receivers. If you frequently tow more than one trailer, investing in a multi-position receiver may be easier and less expensive than buying separate receivers for all trailers. Also, ensure that the receiver ball size matches the hitch of the trailer; attempting to tow a 2-5/16-inch hitch with a two-inch receiver ball is a recipe for disaster.

Prior to loading the trailer, it’s a good idea to give it a full inspection, particularly if it hasn’t been used in a while. Check tire pressuree as well as tire tread depth; tires may show ample tread, but those with signs of dry rot should be replaced. Attempting to wiggle the wheels and tires from side-to-side may show if wheel bearings are worn, and it’s a good idea to pack (non-sealed) bearings with grease annually. Check electrical connections for corrosion, and use dielectric grease on the connector pins to minimize the chance of future corrosion. Inspect wood deck planking for any signs of rot, and replace as necessary. Finally, hitch the trailer to the tow vehicle to double check that all lights (and electric trailer brakes, if equipped) are functioning.

The specific procedure for loading and strapping down a vehicle on a trailer will vary by trailer and the type of ratcheting strap used, but some general guidelines still apply. First, be sure the vehicle’s weight is centered over, or slightly forward of, the trailer’s wheels. As much as you can, ensure that the side-to-side weight of the trailer is balanced by offsetting tool boxes with things like fuel jugs. When using ratcheting straps that cradle a vehicle’s tires, be sure that all attachment points are secure and close enough to the tire to ensure proper operation (per the strap manufacturer’s instruction). When using over-the-axle type ratcheting straps, be sure the strap is wrapped around a structural member, but not rubbing against coolant hoses, fuel lines or brake lines. When using ratcheting straps that attach to the vehicle, ensure (again) that straps are attached to strong enough part of the frame to carry the load. As a general rule of thumb, one strap in each corner should be the absolute minimum number used, and placing four wheel chocks (in front of the front wheels and behind the rear wheels) gives additional piece of mind. As a further reminder, the trailered vehicle should be in Park (or in first gear), with the handbrake set.

Properly hitched trailer, showing sway control bar.

Once the trailer is hitched to the tow vehicle, it’s a good idea to go through one more safety checklist. Is the load level, or does the tongue weight of the trailer (or the drop of the receiver) need to be adjusted? Are all the electrical connections tight, and do all signals, lights and brakes work as intended? Are the safety chains crossed in an X-pattern beneath the trailer hitch, forming a cradle in the event of a hitch failure? Is the tether for the electric trailer brakes set? Is the nose wheel up and locked, and is hitch securely locked into position? Have the lug bolts on the trailer (and any other fasteners potentially prone to loosening) been tensioned to the proper torque?

As with most tasks, prior proper preparation is the key to safe and successful trailering, and the best way to avoid becoming one of the 68,000 plus motorists involved in trailering accidents each year.

A tip of the hat to Brad Babson for his help in compiling this piece.