27 Nov

2018 MOGSouth Holiday Party Weekend Schedule

2018 MOGSouth Holiday Party Weekend Schedule

30 Nov – 1 Dec 18

[This is the latest schedule for the St Simons Island Holiday Party at the King and Prince Resort.  Things can and do change so be flexible.

For those of you that haven’t attended a Holiday Party previously a dress code doesn’t really exist. Just wear whatever is comfy, festive and/or Morgan(ish)?  Some come fancy, others . . . not so much.

Don’t forget to bring cash (or Check) for the Trolley ($20 per person) and for the Banquet Dinner ($41 per person).  Oh, and $25 for 2019 MOGSouth Dues. (And, please keep these as all separate payments so we don’t get too mixed up.)   Cheers, Mark]

Friday –  30 November 2018

  • 3PM – Arrival & Check-In at the King & Prince Resort, St Simons Island GA
  • 3PM – MOGSouth ‘Hospitality Suite’ Open – Wesley Cottage
  • 5:30PM – ‘Hospitality Suite’ Closes for Dinner (Hotel Restaurants, Others in the Community)
  • 9PM – 10:30PM, MOGSouth ‘Hospitality Suite’ Open – Wesley Cottage

Saturday –  1 December 2018

  • Breakfast on your own (Hotel Restaurants, Others in the Community)
  • 10AM – First Trolley Departs Resort Front Door (10AM 1 Dec Trolley Listing)
  • 12PM – Second Trolley Departs Resort Front Door (12PM 1 Dec Trolley Listing)
  • 1PM – MOGSouth ‘Hospitality Suite’ Open – Wesley Cottage
  • 5:30PM – ‘Hospitality Suite’ Closes for Holiday Dinner
  • 6:30PM – 7:30PM, Cash Bar – Solarium
  • 7PM – 8:30PM, MOGSouth Holiday Party – Solarium
    • Mother Courage Award Presentation
  • 9PM – 10:30PM, MOGSouth ‘Hospitality Suite’ Open – Wesley Cottage

Sunday  –  2 December 2018

  • Breakfast on your own (Hotel Restaurants, Others in the Community)
  • Travel Home – Happy Holidays and Stay Safe !!
27 Nov

1966 Morgan Series V roadster for sale (Nov 2018)

[This Morgan is a good one!!  It has all the right bits and David’s cars are always exquisite.  Don’t procrastinate if interested!!  Mark]

This RHD Morgan was treated to a comprehensive ground-up restoration completed in 2009.  Chassis #B1247, restored as an all aluminum car [save cowl and scuttle] as per factory records.

  • upgraded steel chassis supplied by legendary chassis builder, Don Simpkins
  • new wheel arches, body frame, paneled in aluminum by noted Morgan guru, Ron Garner
  • 1.5L Ford engine rebuilt by famed Morgan wizard, Robert Couch of Morgan Spares, to GT specs; Weber 28/36 carb, larger valves, GT cam, header with alloy valve cover
  • High-torque starter, spin-on oil filter
  • Ford T9 five speed gearbox w/ Quaife shifter
  • New front crosshead
  • Spax tubular shocks all around
  • Uprated stub axles, hard chrome kingpins
  • Porterfield brake pads and shoes
  • Black Phey fiberglas fender guards and sill covers
  • Full factory supplied leather interior; seats have lumbar support bladders and custom aircraft foam seat bottoms
  • Mota-lita steering wheel
  • Mojave two speed heater
  • Custom tigers-eye maple dashboard
  • Fold-down windscreen
  • Luggage rack
  • Weather equipment in good to excellent condition
  • Wire wheels, Kumho 165×15 tires

Cover and featured Morgan in May 2011 issue of Hemmings Sports and Exotic Cars magazine as well as April 2012 calendar [full article available at www.hemmings.com archives]

Reluctant sale dictated by advancing age, too small a garage plus inability to drive two cars at once and uninterested sons.  Asking $40,000 or ono.  For further information or to arrange a visit, contact David Crandall at 978-223-5081 or mogdriver@gmail.com.  Serious inquiries only please.

25 Nov

Drill Bits Buying Guide (www.lowes.com Nov 2018)

Learn about the different types of drill bits so you can choose the right ones for your project and for the material you’re drilling.

Types of Drill Bits: Materials and Finishes

The materials from which bits are manufactured and the finishes applied to them play a significant role in the life and performance of the bit. Common materials and finishes:

  • High-Speed Steel (HSS) drill bits can drill wood, fiberglass, PVC (polyvinyl chloride) and soft metals such as aluminum.
  • Cobalt drill bits are extremely hard and dissipate heat quickly. They’re mostly used for boring in aluminum and tough metals such as stainless steel.
  • Black oxide-coated HSS drill bits have a finish designed to help resist corrosion and increase durability. They last longer than basic HSS bits and work well on a variety of materials, including metal, hardwood, softwood, PVC and fiberglass.
  • Titanium-coated HSS drill bits produce less friction. They’re tougher than basic HSS bits and stay sharp longer. They work for drilling wood, metal, fiberglass and PVC.
  • Carbide-tipped drill bitsstay sharp much longer than steel, HSS or titanium bits. They’re effective for drilling tile and masonry.

Drill Bit Construction

For a typical drill bit, the angle of the point helps determine what type of material the bit can drill. Flatter points — such as those with 135-degree angles — are suited for drilling into harder material. They may require a pilot hole to keep the bit from wandering. Bits with steeper points — such as those with 118-degree angles — are suited for softer material. They stay on center better and produce cleaner entry and exit holes. Bits with split-point tips improve drilling accuracy by keeping the bit from wandering when you begin to drill.

Bit size reflects the diameter of the body. Some projects call for specific drill bit sizes, but a bit set that includes sizes from 1/16-inch to 1/4-inch will handle many jobs around the home and workshop. You can add larger bits – 5/16-inch, 3/8-inch, 7/16-inch and 1/2-inch bits if you need them.

The chuck on a hand drill or drill press secures a drill bit to the tool along the bit’s shank. A smaller drill for work around the house typically has a 3/8-inch chuck. More powerful drills for heavier applications have a larger, 1/2-inch chuck. Drill presses also have larger chucks — 1/2-inch or 5/8-inch, for example. The bit shank size must not exceed the chuck size of the drill. A larger bit may have a reduced shank — a shank with a smaller diameter than the body of the bit — allowing you to use it with smaller chucks.

  • A round shank allows you accurately center a bit in the chuck.
  • A hex shank has flat surfaces, allowing the tool to grip the bit more securely for greater torque. Hex shanks such as the one in the image above work with quick-change chucks — common on cordless drills — allowing you to insert and remove them without tightening and loosening the chuck.
  • An SDS (slotted drive system) shank is designed for use on a hammer drill; it fits a spring-loaded chuck that doesn’t require tightening. The bit can move forward and backward with the hammering motion of the drill while flattened areas and slots on the shank allow the chuck to hold the bit.

Twist Drill Bit – A twist bit is the most common type of drill bit for home use. It works for general-purpose drilling in wood, plastic and light metal.


Brad-Point Drill Bit – A brad-point bit is designed for boring into wood. The brad at the center of the bit tip helps position the bit precisely for accurate drilling and produces a clean exit point in the work piece. The flutes — grooves that wrap around the bit and channel away chips and dust — are extra-wide to remove more material.Auger Drill Bit – An auger bit, another type of wood-boring bit, has a screw tip that starts the hole and pulls the bit through the work piece. These bits can be as long as 18 inches. As with the brad-point bit, large flutes help remove chips and dust.  An auger bit with a hollow center provides even more chip removal, one with a solid center is stronger and more rigid.Self-Feed Drill Bit – A self-feed bit bores through wood. Like the auger bit, a screw at the tip helps position the bit and draws it through the work piece. However, this bit is more compact. It doesn’t have the standard flutes of a twist bit, so you need to pull the bit back periodically to clear away chips and dust.

Installer Drill Bit – An installer bit is a specialized twist bit designed for installing wiring. The bit can be up to 18 inches long and drills through wood, plaster and some masonry.

Once you drill through the wall, floor or other surface, you insert a wire into the small hole in the bit and use the bit to draw it back through the hole you bored.

Spade Bit – A spade bit, also known as a paddle bit, bores large-diameter holes — up to 1-1/2 inches in diameter — in wood. It has a flattened blade with a sharp point that helps position and steady the bit. Some spade bits have points at the two edges that help create a neater hole and exit point.

Forstner Drill Bit – A Forstner bit bores smooth, clean holes in wood. You can use it to create flat-bottomed holes — such as for receiving dowels. The design also allows you to overlap holes. A point helps you to position the bit precisely on the workpiece. Pull the bit out regularly to clear away chips and dust as you work. A hand-held drill may not always give you the force or control you need to use a Forstner bit, so a drill press is a better option for some applications.

Hole Saw – A hole saw drills large holes — such as for installing door hardware or creating a pass-through for wiring. A hole saw creates a plug of waste material; a cut-out in the side of the saw cylinder allows you to push it out. Typically, a hole saw attaches to an arbor or mandrel which includes a shank. The arbor also holds a pilot bit for centering and steadying the cutting blade. Some smaller hole saws have a built-in shank and don’t use a pilot bit.

bi-metal hole saw cuts through wood and metal. A hole saw with a carbide edge works on heavier materials such as ceramic tile and masonry. A hole saw with a diamond edge also works on tile and masonry, but cuts faster than carbide models.

Countersink Drill Bit – A countersink bit — also called a screw pilot bit — is a specialty bit for drilling in wood. In a single action, the bit can drill pilot, counter sink and counter bore holes, allowing you to countersink a fastener and install a plug over the fastener head.

Plug Cutter – A plug cutter bores holes in wood, creating wood plugs for use in concealing recessed fasteners.

Step Drill Bit – A step bit is designed primarily for drilling in thin — up to 1/4 inch — metal, but will work with wood. The stepped design allows you to use a single bit to drill holes with different diameters. Often the diameter of each step is etched into the bit. You can also use this type of bit to deburr holes, clearing away waste material.

Tile Drill Bit – A tile bit uses a carbide tip to drill into some types of tile while reducing the chance of chips and cracks. Check the packaging to determine the tile it can drill.

Masonry Drill Bit – A masonry bit drills into tough materials such as concrete, brick and other masonry. Some work with a standard corded or cordless rotary drill, but those designed for use with a rotary hammer or hammer drill can bore into masonry more effectively. The hammering action of the tool drives the carbide tip into the material while the rotating action channels away debris along the flutes.

Other Bit Options – In addition to more common drill bits, there are other options and accessories:

  • Drill saw bits cut irregular holes and contours in wood and metal.
  • Pocket hole bits are included with pocket hole jigs. They allow you drill angled holes that accept screws for making wood joints.
  • Scaling chisels work in rotary hammers or hammer drills for chiseling, scaling and chipping masonry.
  • Depth stops prevent drilling beyond a predetermined depth.
  • Driver bits and bit holders work on a drill / driver to install or remove fasteners.
  • Drill bit extensions give your drill a longer reach.
  • Screw or bolt extractors work with a reversible drill / driver to back out damaged fasteners.
  • Right-angle attachments let you drill and drive in areas where a drill won’t fit.
  • Drill / driver bit sets collect various sizes and styles of bits in a convenient case.
07 Nov

MOGSouth Photo Galleries Sorted by Year – Most Recent on Top (Historic Photos & Factory Visits at Bottom)

2018 Photo Galleries

[These pictures are courtesy Pat and Ken Kreuzer. Thank You!!]

[This is a collection of pictures taken during the 2018 GatorMOG Mid Atlantic Road Trip. There were lots of pictures taken but they cannot all be loaded on the web. The ones uploaded are attributed to a participant on the trip, with their initials embedded in the picture title, e.g. ALB is Andrea Braunstein, RF is Rick Frazee, and RG is Ron Gricius. There is a textual report of the Road Trip posted under Club News and Events. Thanks for all the support. Cheers, Mark]

[Photos with ‘alb’ were taken by Andrea Braunstein, ‘mnb’ were taken by Mark Braunstein and there is one taken by Alan Rae with his name in the title. Enjoy!]

2017 Photo Galleries

[Pictures from the 2017 MOGSouth Fall Meet!!  They were graciously provided by Gary and Judy Heck, Brian and Rosie Miller and someone else whom I cannot recall (Sorry!)  The titles of the pictures include the photographer, if known.    Mark]

2016 Photo Galleries

2015 Photo Galleries

2014 Photo Galleries

2013 Photo Galleries

2012 Photo Galleries

2011 Photo Galleries

2010 Photo Galleries

2009 Photo Galleries

2008 Photo Galleries

2007 Photo Galleries

2006 Photo Galleries

2005 Photo Galleries

2004 Photo Galleries

2003 Photo Galleries

2002 Photo Galleries

2001 Photo Galleries

Morgan Factory Visits (All Years)

2000 and Earlier MOGSouth Historic Photo Galleries

06 Nov

2018 Hilton Head Island Concours d’Elegance.  Morgan Three Wheelers and More!!

WHAT A HOOT!!

Hilton Head Island Concours!   A large Morgan three wheeler class and Harry Gambill’s exquisite 1951 Morgan Plus 4 Drop Head Coupe on the lawn.  I actually think Morgan stole the show!!

The run up to the show, for me anyway, was all about the three wheelers.  I got a call from Peter Olson in Atlanta telling me the Hilton Head Island Concours wants a Morgan Three Wheeler Class for the Concours.  Wow!!  Putting together a class for HHI was a big deal.

And I wasn’t alone.  It seemed that the entire Morgan Three Wheeler community in North America was energized.  We had tremendous interest, even from the West Coast of the US and Canada when the word got out we were forming a class.  There were a good number of folks highly interested in being part of this event; but, unfortunately, we had to limit participation to only 10 cars.  And this was more than HHI had actually wanted (they initially asked for just 5 cars).

This necessitated the selection of cars that were of sufficient quality to meet the high standards of the Hilton Head Island Concours d’Elegance and as broad a spectrum as possible of cars that would allow us to tell the Morgan Three Wheeler story appropriately.  Some may argue we could have chosen attendees differently; however, in the end these cars, unique cars in some way or previous award winners, were selected.

  • 1923 Grand Prix – Bob Barclay (Ontario Canada) – Thought to be the oldest running Morgan in North America.
  • 1930 Anzani Beetleback Super Sports 2SP – John Stanley (DeLand, FL) – Thought to be the only Anzani (or 1 of only 2?) powered Morgan three wheelers in North America.
  • 1932 J.A.P. Beetleback Super Sports – Pete Olson (Atlanta GA) – Very Successful Vintage Racer
  • 1934 Matchless OHV MX4 Beetleback Super Sports – Mark Braunstein (Sanford FL) – Previously Al Moss’ (founder of Moss Motors) Race Car. Raced on the West Coast of the US for 17 Years, to include the famed Monterey Historics.  ‘People’s Choice’ winner at the 2016 Lake Mirror Concours.
  • 1934 Ford Engined ‘F4’ 4 Seater – Gene Spainhour (Hickory NC) – ‘Best in Show’ winner, Morgan Owners Group South (MOGSouth) 40th Anniversary Meet
  • 1935 Matchless Side Valve MX Sports – Fred Veenschoten (Pensacola FL) – ‘Best of Show’ winner at Mobile Bay MC Show
  • 1936 Matchless OHV MX4 Barrelback Super Sports – Rick Frazee (Winter Park FL) –‘Amelia’ award winner at the Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance.
  • 1937 J.A.P. Barrelback Super Sports – Steve Beer (Caledon East, Ontario Canada) – Numerous Awards to include Cobble Beach Concours
  • 1938 Ford Engined F Type Racer – Fred Sisson (Nashville, IN) – ‘People’s Choice’ winner at the 1st Annual Morgan Three Wheeler Convention.
  • 1947 Ford Engined ‘F Super’ F Type – Dave Childress (Crozier VA) – ‘Best in Show’ winner at the Morgan Car Club DC’s annual meet.

As we actually got closer to the date of the HHI Concours, we lost a car due to mechanical gremlins, the 1927 Grand Prix.  The problems could have been rectified with sufficient time, but . . . (Bob and Janet Barclay did come down from Ontario, Canada to join us though, so that was superb.)

It was a shame, nonetheless, and just as we were resolved to this reality, we thought we would lose the 1930 Anzani SS, as well.  John and Debbie Stanley had family issues that precluded their attendance.  But Rick Frazee kept the loss of the Anzani from happening by doing yeoman’s duty and, not only prepared the Stanley’s car for the show, but trailered it to Hilton Head Island in his own trailer along with his own 1936 Super Sports.  (And, certainly, his efforts on the show field presenting the two cars was highly commendable.)

For me it was the start of another Morgan adventure!!  Just back from Safety Harbor in Tampa, FL, we loaded the trailer with the 1934 MX4 SS.  And, just to make things interesting I have new tow vehicle, a Ford F-150 Pickup Truck.  (No longer a Yuppie with an SUV, but now a Bubba with a Pickup Truck!)  Getting to this point really wasn’t easy.

The 1934 Super Sports has had its share of mechanical challenges over the last year.  I first had the flywheel lose its taper and then the electric starter, and its hand ‘crafted’ mount went awry.  This led to a ring gear replacement.  The cobbled together intake manifold was replaced, along with two different-sized stub axle bolts.  One new stub axle with bolt had to be made.  Then it was a broken cam follower.  We welded it back together but bought new ones from the MTWC just in case.  Now it is all good, I hope!!  We started it and Rick Frazee ran it around the block a week or so before the show.

The Hilton Head Island Concours d’Elegance is a very big deal.  A very prestigious show with a tradition of excellence and high quality.  I had no thoughts of winning anything, but I certainly didn’t want to be embarrassed, hence I cleaned, best I could.  The week before the show, all I did was clean.  Well, I tried anyway.  I used a great number of my ‘omnipotent’ jams and jellies in my attempt to clean this car.  My efforts were pretty much in vain, however.  None of my other Morgans ‘oozes’ (as in any sort of fluid, e.g. gas, oil, water, grease, etc.) as much as this car.  Just the short drive from the trailer to the show field will negate everything I had done to clean the car prior to the show.

We drove up to HHI from Florida on Friday, 2 November.  A number of other folks were already there or drove up on Friday as well.  There were a few, though, who got there on Saturday, 3 November.  Just having a group of Morgan three (and four) wheeler owners together is always great fun.  Therefore, we put together a beer call, noggin, dinner at a local restaurant on Saturday when the majority of people would be there.  Everyone who was there had a great time.  We even had the folks that were there to support the folks with cars.  Lots of folks.  Good stories, baby pictures, good beer and good times.  This is what this Morgan stuff is all about!

The Hilton Head show also had a vintage aircraft/car display that was held on Saturday.  We had two three wheelers (the Beers’ and the Childress’) that were part of this display and their cars were paired with vintage aircraft and displayed on the airfield during the day on Saturday.

All the other cars found their way to the show field either late Saturday or early Sunday morning.  Having a dedicated Morgan Three Wheeler Class is very special occurrence, as evidenced by the large crowd and substantial interest we attracted.

The designated Morgan Three Wheeler Class display area was tight though.  Made so by some inconsiderate MG owner who parked his car right in the middle of where the Morgans were supposed to go on Saturday night and did not come to move his car until 10 minutes before the show was supposed to start.  We had to work around this issue and, since we were a large class already, we were parked quite close together.  This worried us some when we thought about the crowd.  In the end, it didn’t matter and made for a great display.  The cars being close together invited comparisons.  We had a huge crowd of onlookers and folks quite amazed by the odd, if not archaic, technology.

The Morgans Three Wheelers on the Show Field 

The judges came, studied each car, asked questions, taking their time.  The primary judge was no other than automotive author, Ken Gross, who owned a Morgan Three Wheeler in the 1970s.  Ken was very knowledgeable and quite inquisitive.  Ken’s articles have appeared in Road & Track, GQ, Special Interest Automobiles, Automobile Quarterly, Automobile, Playboy, Hemmings – over 40 different publications and he has been directly involved with 6 major automotive museums.  We couldn’t have asked for a better judge.

Pat and Ken Kreuzer, MOGSouth members from Summerville, SC came by on Sunday to see what all the Morgan fuss was about.  We also had help of Elliot Balo and his lovely wife, Jennifer.  Elliot is a rare bird these days.  He is young.  Well, certainly in comparison to the rest of us!  And, in a day and age where the younger among us have no interest in the messy business of mechanical things, Elliot is very passionate about vintage Morgan three wheelers.  When he heard we were showing cars at Hilton Head, he jumped on the opportunity to come see the cars and offered to assist in any way possible.  Well, he got his opportunity, and even got a Morgan Three Wheeler driving lesson, thanks to Bob Barclay.  He took to it like a duck to water.  Oh, did I mention it was during our Sunday afternoon rain?

In addition to the Hilton Head Island Concours d’ Elegance trophies presented (First in Class, and two Palmetto Awards), there was a special Morgan Three Wheeler award presented, the Graeme Addie Morgan ‘Innovation Award.’  We thought we would be doing the Special Award presentation, however, the HHI Concours judges actually selected the winner of this very special award and that took the burden off of us.  It is so very hard, for me anyway, to make decisions like this when all the cars were exceptional, superbly prepared and all represented by good Morgan friends.

 

The Best in Class Winner, Steve Beer J.A.P. SS (Photo Courtesy of Andrea Braunstein (ALB))

 

Palmetto Award Winner, Dave Childress F Super (Photo Courtesy of ALB)

 

Palmetto Award Winner, Gene Spainhour F4  (Photo Courtesy of ALB)

Special Award Winner, Mark Braunstein MX4 SS (Photo Courtesy of ALB)

But, it wasn’t all about 3 Wheelers.   Harry’s 1951 Plus 4 DHC took Best in Class, and deservedly so.  The car was absolutely stellar!

Harry Gambill’s 1951 DHC Best in Class Winner (Photo Courtesy of ALB)

The only downside to the whole weekend was the rain late Sunday afternoon.  It hurried the awards presentations along (which actually was good thing) but loading the cars was a bit of challenge.  Everything and everyone was soaked.

We stayed the night in Hilton Head, leaving the drive home for Monday.  And there was nothing hurried about Monday.  We went to breakfast with friends, Sam and Rick Frazee and Alan and MaryAnn Rae.  Alan and MaryAnn Rae, who own a lovely green roadster came as spectators rather than exhibitors and, being Canadians, had site seeing to do while the rest of us just headed for home.

Well, anyway we got home with almost no issues or drama.  Really nothing significant.  No rain, no mechanical problems, nada.  The way I like it.  The only scary bit was my new truck.  This is just about the first real trip I have made pulling the trailer with it and it has some new-fangled odds and ends for trailering.  So, in the midst of the run down I-95, I was starting to yawn.  Andrea is texting to Sam Frazee to find a truck stop.  Perhaps a cup of coffee.

Then, a loud beep, and a dash message “Trailer Disconnected!”  Yikes!  Where did it go?  I frantically looked in my mirrors – nope it is still there, a big white thing.  It’s all I can see!  Then another loud beep, and “Trailer Status – Normal!”  Well, I was awake now but I think my heart stopped.  We soon pulled off I-95 and I checked.  All good.  Must have been a Morgan gremlin!

I have yet to fully unload the car and the trailer.  I looked at it briefly when we arrived, and everything was a bit of a shambles, and damp, just like it went in.  I was a bit too tired to tackle unloading yesterday.  That is today’s activity.  I was more prepared for a few large glasses of wine and an early bed time.

Oh, well this Morgan adventure had to end, so it’s back to the daily drudge, at least for a little while.  The MOGSouth Holiday Party is just a few weeks away and I am looking forward to seeing everyone again!

Now to get that trailer unloaded!

Cheers, Mark

[Be sure to see the Photo Gallery with more great pictures from the 2018 Hilton Head Island Concours d’Elegance. Click the Link Below. Mark]