21 Feb

2019 MOGSouth Spring Meet 17 – 19 May (Update – 21 Feb)

The MOGSouth Spring Meet will be in Augusta GA, May 17-19. The designated meet Hotel is the Partridge Inn, 2110 Walton Way, Augusta GA 30904.  (Tel. 706-737-8888)

FIRST THINGS FIRST, MAKE YOUR HOTEL RESERVATIONS NOW! 

The Original Block of Rooms are gone!! The hotel has added just a few more rooms, so make your Reservations NOW!!

Guests need to call the Partridge Inn directly (706-737-8888) for their reservations and use the ‘MOGSouth’ group name.

This MOGSouth rate includes breakfast for all of the room occupants. Standard Rooms are $139.00 per night, Suites are $149.00 and rooms with Balconies are $159.00.

Don’t Forget to Send Dorothy an Email with the Following information.

Please send her an email to moore_dorothy@bellsouth.net or call 678-513-2931, (c) 404-678-4236.  DO THIS NOW !!!

NAME:______________________________________________________

__(Check Mark for Yes) Staying at The Partridge Inn, 2110 Walton Way, Augusta GA 30904 – 706-737-8888

__(Check Mark for Yes) No hotel needed, NOT staying at the Partridge INN, but attending the Fall Meet

__(Check Mark for Yes) Bringing a Morgan    ________

Trailering ________

(If Yes) Year ________Model__________Color____________

__ Number of People for Dinner Saturday evening at The Cucina 503

(Note: Things always seem to change, so stay flexible as we work through the details.) 

If there are questions, Please Ask.

Looking forward to seeing you all at The Partridge Inn!!

 Thanks….

19 Feb

2019 MOGSouth Noggin (8 Mar) and Cars & Coffee at Amelia Island (9 Mar) – 3rd Update – as of 19 Feb 2019

The MOGSouth Noggin at Amelia Island will occur Friday (8 March) evening and we will again participate in the Saturday (9 March) Cars and Coffee.

The MOGSouth Noggin will start at 5PM and continue until whenever. The location for the noggin is new this year (after all the complaint of difficult parking). It is now being held at the Salt Life Food Shack, 39 N Fletcher Ave Fernandina Beach, FL 32034. Note: Still good food and beer, but better parking.

The formal Concours d’Elegance is scheduled for Sunday 10 March but has in the past been moved up to Saturday if the weather is challenging.

Last year we had more than 50 folks from the Morgan community attend the Noggin. Folks from all over, not just MOGSouth. This year we will have special guests, as well. So you will want to be there.

Then Saturday morning (9 March), those of us with Morgans, will all gather at 0730 (yes I know it’s early) at the Surf Restaurant’s front parking lot, along A1A (3199 S. Fletcher Avenue, Amelia Island, FL.)

You will have to had to apply and been accepted (they have mailed a windshield sticker to those that have been accepted) to get onto the Cars and Coffee field. They do this because they are space limited.

From experience we know that if we don’t arrive together, we will be parked where ever they have a space, and most likely not together.

We will only wait at the Surf Restaurant for 10 minutes or less, so don’t be late!

You need not register if you don’t bring your car and simply want to spectate.

This year we will have something special to look forward to. The Morgan Motor Company (MMC) will have 3 – 5 new Morgan cars on display at the MotorXpo area (the first hole of the Golf Club of Amelia Island.) 

For those coming from out of town, there are a number of Lodging options. You can stay on Amelia Island or you can find something around the North- Eastern side of Jacksonville. It is really just a short (30-45 min) drive along FL-105 from Jacksonville to Amelia Island.

If you have questions, please ask.

Plan on a great Morgan weekend and we hope to see you there!!

Cheers, Mark 

19 Feb

2019 MOGSouth Spring Meet (May 17-19)

As you all know, the Spring Meet will be in Augusta GA, May 17-19. The designated meet Hotel will be the Partridge Inn, 2110 Walton Way, Augusta GA 30904.  (Tel. 706-737-8888)

FIRST THINGS FIRST, MAKE YOUR HOTEL RESERVATIONS NOW! 

The Hotel is holding rooms for MOGSouth until APRIL 16TH . . . and according to the latest reports they are going fast! Do it now, or risk not getting a room at the hotel. They report they have wedding and such the same time so rooms might not be available if you procrastinate.

Guests need to call the Partridge Inn directly (706-737-8888) for their reservations and use the ‘MOGSouth’ group name.

This MOGSouth rate includes breakfast for all of the room occupants. Standard Rooms are $139.00 per night, Suites are $149.00 and rooms with Balconies are $159.00.

The Partridge Inn is an historic southern style and quaint hotel, but now in the hands of Hilton and is efficient, clean and well-managed. It has a roof-top bar that overlooks the city and balcony rooms that overlook the beautiful pool and lounging area.

NOW A FEW MORE THINGS – Dorothy needs to know the following information for the Hotel, the Restaurant, the Hospitality Suite, etc.  

Please send her an email to moore_dorothy@bellsouth.net or call 678-513-2931, (c) 404-678-4236.

NAME:______________________________________________________

__(Check Mark for Yes) Staying at The Partridge Inn, 2110 Walton Way, Augusta GA 30904 – 706-737-8888

__(Check Mark for Yes) No hotel needed, NOT staying at the Partridge INN, but attending the Fall Meet

__(Check Mark for Yes) Bringing a Morgan (Bringing a Morgan IS NOT required! Come and join us with or without the car!)

(If Yes) Year ________Model__________Color____________

__ Number of People for Dinner Saturday evening at The Cucina 503

(Note: Things always seem to change, so stay flexible as we work through the details.) 

If there are questions, Please Ask.

Looking forward to seeing you all at The Partridge Inn!!

19 Feb

Roadster Run!

It’s chilly outside . . . got to go south!  Well it’s only 60° but even so I’m chilly, none the less.  Been in Florida too long.  I think my blood has thinned.

This weekend is the Gold Coast British Sports Car Club All British Car Show (actually the 26th annual).  It is down in South Florida where it’s warmer.  We go every year as we have several MOGSouth members down that way and it’s good to see them every now and again.  It used to be in Boca Raton but now is in West Palm Beach.  Still south, still warmer!

We have few folks from North / Central Florida going along with us, as well.  Perhaps they too are chilly?  Allan and Mary Ann Rae, Chuck and Karen Bernath, and Robin and Christine Bycroft.  The others in the area are either predisposed or in some other way committed . . . off racing or vacationing in Asia or some such.  But it won’t be a problem as I suspect we will join another 4 – 6 Morgans once we get there.  And a host of other British Cars. 

Getting there is a logistics challenge.  We all come from differing parts of Florida and need to travel on different roads.  However, as it is more fun to travel in packs, we have a rendezvous or two in the plan with designated gathering spots and hook-up times, along the route.  Gas and rest stops are always good! 

I took the Roadster out this time.  It has been a few months since the car has had a good run.  Also, I just changed the oil and filter, and completed a full maintenance (112 tasks) session on the car.  This has got to make it faster . . . right?  The only problematic thing I found during all that maintenance was an inoperable front (passenger side) turn indicator.  I figured a bulb was blown but when I pulled off the lens it was much more than that.  The whole thing was corroded.  An entire new light or at least a new bulb receptacle was in order . . . but then, after some thought and being cheap, I figured I might be able to rebuild it! 

I rummaged around in my bin of bits and found some derelict light housings.  Actually, I found three old round light bases, complete with wires.  Two had a single wire to the bulb and one had two wires.  And of course, the size and shape were different from the corroded one on the Roadster.  Progress, I assume! 

I contemplated the differences for a few minutes, pondering all sorts of Morgan induced gremlins, until it finally occurred to me that the two with only the single wire were both steel and the one with the double wire was aluminum.  Why the change, I thought.  The steel ones said Lucas while the aluminum one was devoid of any markings.  Perhaps someone was afraid to admit to making the thing or perhaps it was just an aftermarket piece?  

Ah ha!  The steel ones were grounded directly when bolted to the car.  No need for a grounding wire.  The aluminum one however needed a grounding wire.  Aluminum isn’t the best conductor of electricity.  Again, that college education pays off! 

I then decided that since the size and shape were different, I would only use the inner bulb receptacle.  I took the aluminum one, the one with the two wires, and cut away all but the needed bulb receptacle.  I then stuffed this bulb receptacle into the recess left when I removed the corroded one from the Roadster.  A tight fit, but a fit none the less.  I tested it with a new bulb.  And, there was light! 

I tightened it all back up and bingo, I had turn indicators!  An hour of fiddling about and it was all good again.  Ok, the car was ready for the road!

Now to gather all the requisite stuff.  It’s not that Morgans lack storage space, there’s plenty.  It’s that we have become too accustomed to travel with all sorts of crap.  Chairs and hats and phones and blankets, tools and rags and on and on.  Not to mention the bulging suitcase on the luggage rack! 

Finally, . . . down the road we go!

We stayed at the designated hotel chosen by the Gold Coast British Sports Car Club.  It was right next to the show field . . nothing too fancy, clean and affordable.  Close to the show was good for us as we really didn’t want to drive all over an unknown location, risk getting lost or arriving late, or worse yet missing the show altogether.  And, this hotel had free breakfast and was in walking distance of a decent restaurant.  We gathered for dinner and walked to the recommended sports bar, BJs, for our evening repast.  A sports bar is fine for this crowd, lots of options for food, beer and wine, and the noise level wasn’t adversely impacted by our raucous babble.  

The free hotel breakfast came earlier that I liked but there it was in all it’s glory . . . cardboard waffles and rubber eggs.  I had coffee. 

Then we all piled into the cars and drove, had to be all of a mile, to the show.  We were parked all together this year (last year we were scattered about), except Robin and Christine Bycroft who were past Class winners and were parked in a separate ‘Prestige Class’ with the other past winners. 

The Morgans had quite a respectable showing.  We had 7 Morgans in the show counting the (1) Bycroft’s lovely BRG 1989 Plus 8. 

(2) 1967 Plus 4 Drop Head Coupe (Cream w/ Brown Wings) belonging to Gil & Barbara Stegen
(3) 1980 Plus 8 Fuel Injected Turbo (Gray w/ Black Wings) belonging to Chuck & Karen Bernath
(4) 2003 Anniversary Edition Plus 8 (Aston Martin Green) belonging to Bennett & Mary Shulman
(5) 2005 3.0L Roadster (BRG) belonging to Allan & Mary Ann Rae
(6) 2005 3.0L Roadster (Cream w/ BRG Wings) belonging to Mark & Andrea Braunstein
(7) 2018 3.7L Roadster (Blue) with only 100 miles, belonging to Lewis Pollack.

The Morgan Class winner was the ’67 Plus 4 Drop Head Coupe belonging to Gil & Barbara Stegen and rightly so.  The car was lovely and superbly displayed (as always).  Second in Class went to Bennett & Mary Shulman’s spectacular 2003 Anniversary Edition Plus 8.  Third in Class then went to the extremely well prepared 2005 3.0L BRG Roadster, goggles and all, belonging to Allan & Mary Ann Rae.  Then they announced the Prestige Class winners and Robin and Christine’s 1989 BRG Plus 8 took second in a group of quite stellar competition.  I dare say the Morgans did quite well on the day!

A big highlight of the show, for us Morgan types anyway, was ogling Lewis Pollack’s brand new, 2018, component 3.7L Roadster.  What a lovely machine!  We were all drooling.  Blue over cream leather.  Wow!  Lewis quickly fit right in with the MOGSouth crowd and as he is already a member of the club, I suspect we will see this car again, quite soon.

After the show, it was back to the hotel for a nap.  Then off to another sports bar for dinner.  This time we had to drive, but it wasn’t far.  Dinner came and went.  Then back to bed.  We were all spent.  The midday sun and 85°+ temperatures had done us all in.  

Hotel breakfast again on Monday.  There was a plan to convoy home, but it somehow fell apart.  The two Roadsters, Raes and Braunsteins, set off together to explore the coastline and meander North.  Banyan tree canopies, sparkles of sun light and glimpses of the ocean.  Marvelous!  And, then there were the mansions. 

We meandered along the Florida coastline traveling north but really getting nowhere fast . . . (photo courtesy of Allan Rae)

Now, I understand large homes and even waterfront properties.  But these were simply amazing!  It boggled the mind.  Most houses had a driveway, ok we all have one of those, but then 100 yards or more, further down, they had a ‘Service Entrance’.  These houses must have been massive!  Really, a Service Entrance?  Wow!  

Now I want a ‘Service Entrance.’  I may just make a sign . . .

The Bernath’s had taken off a bit earlier and found the Elliot Museum, in Stuart Florida.  They stopped, so we stopped.  What an amazing place!  The collections at the museum were eclectic.  Vintage cars, wooden boats, airplanes, dioramas of a vintage kitchen and a commercial pharmacy with soda shop, a model train collection, outboard motors, Frances Langford’s wardrobe (she sang with Bob Hope on many USO tours), and much more.  

The most incredible thing, for me anyway, was the vintage car storage machine (sort of like a car vending machine?)  Just watching this thing was worth the entire stop.  Although there were many cars openly displayed in the various rooms, there were some 54 cars stored in a large, temperature and humidity controlled, glass enclosed machine / complex.  They were stored three levels high and two rows deep.  The docent had a computer controlled selector and when he selected a specific car, the machine went and found the car.  It then lifted it up and put the car on an elevator, which brought it down, moving it to the center of the complex, and then displayed it (rotating it on a turn style) just in front of where we were sitting.  We couldn’t get enough of this thing and asked to see some three different cars.  The cars were cool, but the machine, moving the cars around, was even cooler.  We stopped before the darn thing broke.  We feared the worst as the docent indicated the company that manufactured the complex machine went belly up a year after it was created, and the machine was now the most demanding maintenance item in the entire museum!  

We soon left the museum and continued up the coast to a water front restaurant (Kyle Gs) for lunch.  Chuck Bernath got there a few minutes before we did and wrangled parking spaces, for the Morgans, at the front door.  Thank you, Chuck!  This was certainly appreciated (as the parking lot was overflowing.)  Although the restaurant was pretty crowded, they found us a table with a view.  Excellent service and excellent food. 

Then it was back in the cars and up the coast.  West to I-95 and a dash for home.  

A bit hot in south Florida but all-in-all good fun!  Great cars, great company and really another great Morgan weekend! 

Oh, and just as I pulled off the highway, with no more than a mile or two to get to my house, the turn indicator I had fixed, stopped working.  Go figure?  Oh, the pleasures of Morgan ownership!

See you soon!
Mark

04 Feb

How to Change Your Morgan’s Oil (NAPA – 2 February 2019)

[Changing your vehicle’s engine oil is not difficult but unfortunately we sometimes fail to perform this recurring task. This can happen for any number of reasons; lack of time, lack of space, lack of tools, etc. However, changing the oil is one of the most important things you can do to keep your Morgan on the road. If you can’t do it at home take the car to a oil changing service in town. They are everywhere. Just don’t forget to get it done. It is best to change your oil as suggested by your Morgan handbook, but in general every 3,000 – 5,000 miles or three months or so. Changing the engine oil too often won’t hurt the car! In addition to mileage you may need to change the engine’s oil for other reasons. In many of the places we live the temperature and humidity changes wreak havoc on our engine’s oil. Water from condensation will contaminate the engine’ oil and dilute it’s ability to lubricate your motor. You may also want to change the engine’s oil when your prepare you car for a long period of disuse, e.g. the winter. (Oil can turn acidic over time and that’s not good.) Mark]

Things you’ll need from your garage :

  • Oil catch/recycle container
  • Funnel
  • New oil filter
  • Oil drain plug gasket (Using a new one is recommended)
  • 4-5 qt. new oil*
  • Oil filter wrench set**
  • Clean rags
  • Car jack
  • Jack stands
  • Safety glasses
  • Mechanics work gloves
  • Hand cleaner

*Check your owner’s handbook for your vehicle’s oil capacity.

**If you plan to change your oil regularly, consider investing in a small tool set, an oil filter wrench set, a quality floor jack and jack stands.

Step 1 – Park your car on a level surface and apply parking brake.

Run your engine for 5 minutes before draining oil, as warm oil drains faster than cold. Do NOT drain oil that is at full operating temperature as it will be too hot to safely handle.  It is recommended that you remove the key for the ignition to preclude any accidental engine starts.

Step 2 – Jack your car up and place it on jack stands.

A jack alone will not safely support the full weight of your car. Consult your manual for the proper jacking points. The placement of a jack stand is just as important as the jack placement. The wrong placement can damage your car’s suspension or body parts.

Step 3 – Locate the oil drain plug and place the drain pan below.

The oil drain plug is usually near the front center of the engine, but some vehicles have more than one plug. Check your manual for the exact location. Loosen the plug with a socket or wrench. Make sure that the drain pan is large enough to hold 4-5 quarts of oil or more.

Step 4 – Unscrew the plug by hand.

Remove the plug by hand. While unscrewing the plug, push it back towards the vehicle. This keeps oil from rushing out until you are ready to remove the plug from the hole.  Note: For engines with oil drains on the side, the oil is likely to drain at an angle, e.g. squirt out a foot or so.   Position the drain pan to catch it and be sure to adjust the pan’s location as it drains. 

[I have had lots of oil squirt onto the floor, outside to the pan, by not paying attention. Mark]

Step 5 – Drain all oil.

To speed up the draining process, remove the filler cap located on the top of the engine and allow air to enter from the top.

Step 6 – Replace oil plug.

Tighten the oil plug by hand and ensure it is not cross-threaded. Once the plug is snug, finish tightening it with a wrench or by hand. Always use a new drain plug gasket if you have one and never over-tighten the drain plug.

Step 7 – Remove existing oil filter.

Place the oil pan underneath the old filter to catch any remaining oil while unscrewing it. Remove the old filter using an oil filter wrench if you have one.  [Sometimes a strap wrench can be used, or if necessary, stick a screw driver into the body of the filter to give you something to turn. Use a rag to clean the mounting surface. Make sure that the sealing O-ring from the old filter is not stuck to the mounting surface on the engine.

Step 8 – Lubricate new filter and screw into place by hand.

Lightly coat the rubber seal of the new filter with fresh oil. It’s usually not necessary to tighten the oil filter with the wrench. Refer to the filter’s instructions. Once the filter is installed, lower the car.

Step 9 – Clean the oil filter neck and pour in the new oil using a funnel.

Typically, you will use 4 to 5 quarts of oil, but check your manual for your vehicle’s oil capacity. Fill to three-quarters of the engine’s capacity to avoid overfilling, as there is always oil that does not drain. Then replace the cap.

Step 10 – Run the engine for a few minutes to make sure there are no leaks.

Check the area around the oil drain plug and the filter for any leaks. If you notice a leak, shut the engine off immediately and remedy any leaks. Check the dipstick afterward and add more oil if necessary.

Step 11 – Dispose of the used oil properly.

Bring your used oil to a recycling center to recycle the oil for you (or many auto parts stores or oil change service business will take it but check with them first).  These are the only acceptable methods for oil disposal.

IMPORTANT TIPS:

  • Make sure your car is securely supported.
  • Record the date and mileage after you change the oil so you will know when your car is due for another oil change.  
  • Handle hot motor oil with extreme caution.
  • Use mechanic’s gloves to keep your hands protected and clean.
  • Only dispose of used motor oil and filters at authorized locations.