27 Mar

Morgan Plus 4 an intoxicating mix of old and new (www.irishexaminer.com, 27 March 2021)

Morgan has recently appointed a distributor for Ireland and the company, still on the go after some 111 years, has now unleashed the first in its ‘CX-Generation’

When Henry Frederick Stanley Morgan founded the Morgan Motor Company in the Malvern Hills back in 1910, I doubt very much he thought the company would be on the go 111 years later, still producing unique and bespoke sports cars.

The fact that the company is still fully functioning is a credit not only to Henry Morgan’s vision, but also to that of an Italian-owned investment company which took it over in 2019, promising to expand the operation which is still based in the small British town of Malvern Link.

Some 220 people are employed in the manufacture of Morgan cars and roughly 850 units are made annually in an operation that is actually a lot more modern than most people think, even though the marque’s characteristic trait — the use of wood in the manufacture of the chassis — is still part and parcel of the company’s raison d’etre.

Although the rose-tinted vision of a Morgan probably involves a Spitfire pilot with a twirly moustache, a silk scarf, and a blonde WAAF speeding along Second World War-era English country lanes, the modern incarnation of the car differs little in appearance but those driving them these days are certainly nothing like the originals.

Down the years, Morgan has made everything from three-wheelers to roadsters to coupes, and they were renowned for such as their sliding pillar suspension and their wooden chassis, made of ash and African Bubinga red hardwood. Over time, the cars grew a modest but well-heeled fan base who adored not only the retro look and manufacturing techniques, but also the lovingly sporty nature of these handmade specials.

Latterly, and especially so since the company’s takeover by Italian investment group InvestIndustrial in 2019, the business has re-emerged as a more focused and modern entity. 

You can add a hand-stitched leather interior, if you so desire. Picture: Dan Linehan

This is underscored by the fact that its current model line-up now has the essential Morgan look, but is underpinned by modern construction techniques — albeit still incorporating an element of wood within.

The company describes the modern models — the Plus Six and the Plus Four — as being the first in its ‘CX-Generation’ which bear a bonded aluminium platform which is much stronger than the traditional chassis. They sport BMW engines and gearboxes instead of the Matchless, JAP, Coventry Climax, Standard, Triumph, Rover, and Ford engines the company used down the years.

Morgan says that despite the look and feel of the new Plus Four, it remains the same as when the model was first revealed almost seven decades ago; only 3% of the components are shared with the outgoing version. 

And, having driven it, I can confirm that the new beast is a whole lot more ready for the modern world than anything that preceded it.

As brand development is now moving along nearly as quickly as one of the company’s products, it is appropriate that this new era for the company is reflecting a push for new markets and customers.

Irish distributor

That is why Morgan has recently appointed a distributor for Ireland (all 32 counties) and why it has reached out to someone with lifelong connections to the industry here and a special connection with motorists who like something different from the norm.

The new distributor is a company called Edgewood Automotive and the man running it is Fermoy, Co Cork-based Wayne McCarthy, the son of the late but legendary industry figure John McCarthy, who ran an Opel franchise, among many other business interests, in the town for decades.

Wayne also ran the Motorpoint operation on the Lower Rd in Cork City for many years; it was a Saab dealership as well as the source for many unusual automotive imports to this country.

He is not only terribly proud of his history in the business, but also noticeably confident about the future of a brand such as Morgan, even given its undoubtedly niche status.

Even though the entry-level Plus Four model will cost north of €100,000 here, it is easy to see why his confidence in the product is not in any way rash. The whole issue here is that while you can order an-off-the-line model, you can also personalise it to the max.

The list of stuff you can add to the car — everything from a hand-stitched leather interior to the bespoke Avon tyres and the specially crafted wire wheels to the brass knock-offs which hold them in place — is extraordinary and will certainly appeal to people who like the word ‘unique’. 

Element of trepidation

There is an element of trepidation involved in taking anything of this nature for a spin — especially around the unfamiliar backroads of north Cork — and the mild expectation is certainly present that you’re about to be subjected to a boneshaker which can trace its roots back to a time not long after the Wright Brothers were first taking flight.

Fire it up and you get a low burbling thrum encouraging you to find out what’s possible here. Picture: Dan Linehan

Nothing could be further from the truth. Lower yourself — you have to, believe me — into the driver seat and you find yourself cossetted by high-grade leather and appropriate amounts of dashboard and centre console wood, of which there are seven options. You look out on the long, hand-louvred bonnet and get a feeling of unadulterated motoring richness.

Fire it up and you get a low burbling thrum encouraging you to find out what’s possible here. And with 255 bhp on offer, what’s possible is nearly alarming. Boasting a dry weight of 1,009kg, the Plus Four is light, but with that four-pot BMW turbo under the hood, there’s no shortage of poke and an eight-speed auto ‘box, also from Munich, helps get that power on the road when and where you want it.

Top speed is a shade over 240km/h and the 0-100km/h dash is achieved in just 4.8 seconds, which is 0.4 of a second quicker than the option with the six-speed manual gearbox. These figures suggest a certain fleetness of foot and they are not wrong because the rate of progress here is pretty savage.

That being so and what with the car also being rear-wheel drive, you might jump to the conclusion that you’ll be applying the opposite lock on a fairly regular basis — depending, of course, how far you dial up the inner hooligan — but unless you’re very bold or very dumb, that does not have to be the case.

In fact, the car is nothing like as tail-happy as I anticipated and even on dampish roads, there was nothing of the sphincter-tightening nature I expected. I thought I might be heading for Castlelyons looking mainly out the passenger window, but there was none of that.

Neither was there much blood-rushing when the brakes were applied. Once upon a time, Morgans were noted for their reluctance to stop, but now there is a proper ABS system onboard here and any thoughts you may have had of a fishtailing, smoke-wreathed roadster can be dismissed.

This is indeed a beauteous beast and while some might find the retro look a little naff, those who appreciate the hand-built craft on offer, as well as the modern chassis and drivetrain, will look to the individuality and distinctiveness that Morgan sells and they will embrace that fully.

This is a car with great history and now, also, a great future. It melds the old and the new into a fascinating concoction of thrills and heritage with a large dash of exclusivity. 

That’s a blend that’s definitely intoxicating.

Colley verdict – The cost: From €106,000, The engine: A muscular two-litre petrol turbo, The specification: You can have pretty much anything you desire, The overall verdict: A classic, Star Rating: *****

21 Feb

The 2022 Morgan Plus 8 GTR Track Car Happened Because Morgan Refused to Let Unused Chassis Go to Waste

The Bristol Bullet was set to be a Morgan Plus 8-based retro drop-top powered by a BMW V8—except now we’re getting nine 2022 Plus 8 GTRs instead.

Founded in 1945 primarily to keep the Bristol Aeroplane Company’s crew busy after the war, Bristol Cars went from using pre-war BMW technology to producing some of the most quintessentially British motorcars ever made, all hand-built to Rolls-Royce-rivaling standards. Bristol maintained a single dealership on the corner of London’s Kensington High Street and Holland Road, and this conservative attitude towards sales slowly and steadily pushed it into bankruptcy by 2010. The group that bought Bristol’s assets promised a new speedster by 2015, powered by a BMW V8 and limited to 70 units to celebrate Bristol’s 70th anniversary.

“Project Pinnacle” led to a drivable Bristol Bullet prototype presented at the 2016 Goodwood Festival of Speed, only for the new venture to go silent afterwards and into liquidation in 2020. Yet back in 2015, the new Bristol company purchased rolling chassis from Morgan for the Bullet—specifically, the Plus 8 bonded aluminum platform fitted with a 370-horsepower BMW V8. As with Les Edgar’s revival of TVR, the Bristol rebirth looked great until it didn’t. 

2016 Bristol Bullet prototype at the Goodwood Festival of Speed.

The Bullet itself made perfect sense. A hot limited-edition speedster with BMW powered just like the original Bristols, except styled somewhat like a late 2010s restomod AC Cobra. Given the size and enthusiasm of the British collector car market, the entire 70-car run could surely sell out in no time. 

With its suitably long hood, fine leather inside the two-seater cabin, AP Racing brakes and German V8, the Bullet could have been a proper dream machine.

Two years ago, the Morgan Motor Company had to move on to a new aluminum platform that used turbocharged straight-six BMW engines to keep up with our times. However, when nine of its old Plus 8 rolling chassis went up for sale when Bristol closed, Morgan quickly realized that nine track-focused specials based on that older tech could be built for 2022. The resulting Plus 8 GTRs would feature a naturally aspirated V8 under a new aerodynamic Plus 8 body that pays tribute to Charles Morgan’s mad “Big Blue” endurance racer from 1995. 

As Morgan put it: “The project has only been possible because of the recent availability of a number of Plus 8 rolling chassis, which have been re-acquired from a third party following a discontinued project.”

Big Blue was Morgan’s test bed for the then-new bonded aluminum chassis that made the Aero 8 and other roaring V8 sports cars possible. This new run of nine 2022 Plus 8 GTRs will be what the Bristol Bullet couldn’t, only with a roof and the rest of Morgan’s bold design.

2022 Morgan Plus 8 GTR – MORGAN MOTOR CARS
18 Feb

New Morgan Plus 8 GTR confirmed for 2021

Production of special-edition Morgan Plus 8 GTR will begin this summer, limited to nine examples

www.autocar.co.uk/ 18 February 2021

A special-edition Morgan Plus 8 GTR will be built this summer, three years after production of the standard car officially came to an end.

Morgan says the GTR will be a “gloves off” version of the Plus 8, with the project made possible after several chassis earmarked for a discontinued external project were reacquired from a third party.

Only nine examples of the Morgan Plus 8 GTR will be built, but the British firm is set to reveal several other special edition models in 2021.

Power will come from a 4.8-litre BMW N62 engine, although Morgan has suggested that output from the recommissioned units will be higher than the 362bhp achieved in their original specification. Six-speed manual and automatic transmissions will be offered, although allocations for these are fixed for the production run.

The chassis are completely unused, having been built by Morgan before 2018. The company says some mechanical components will be upgraded for use in the Plus 8 GTR.

“Reviving a V8-powered Morgan at the current time may not seem like the obvious choice for a manufacturer firmly focused on new platforms and powertrains,” said Morgan’s head of design, Jonathan Wells. “However, when the opportunity presented itself to recommission a number of rolling chassis and create an exciting special project such as Plus 8 GTR, we embraced it fully.

“This project has allowed Morgan’s design and engineering teams to revisit some of their favourite elements of past Morgan models, as well as experiment with some features that we hope will appear on future Morgan cars.”

Morgan’s design and engineering teams have been told to “let their imaginations run wild” for the GTR, with inspiration coming from the ‘Big Blue’ GT series racer of the 1990s. That vehicle was used as a test bed for the bonded-aluminium chassis tech that later replaced Morgan’s traditional steel chassis in 2004.

With a full unveiling due before the car enters production this summer, sketches show the GTR sporting a high shoulder line “not seen on a traditional Morgan body for decades”.

The wheel arches have been resculpted and the five-spoke centre-lock wheels are a nod to the Plus 8’s racing heritage. The rear end, front wings and front splitter have all been reworked, with a hard-top replacing the original fabric item.

Every example of the GTR will be handcrafted using traditional coachbuilding techniques, but in a break from tradition, production will take place at the Morgan Design and Engineering Centre (M-DEC) rather than at the Pickersleigh Road factory.

Customers will be given the chance to create a bespoke Plus 8 GTR with the help of Morgan’s design team.

20 Jan

Replica Car Production Update (www.hemmings.com, 20 Jan 2021)

Replica car production expected to start within months after NHTSA rulemaking

Replica car sales permitted under the Low Volume Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Act will start to take place within the next few months now that the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has – after five years, numerous reminders, and one lawsuit prodding the agency – issued its final regulations on the matter.

“The roadblocks have been eliminated,” SEMA President Chris Kersting said in a press statement. “SEMA applauds NHTSA’s final rule allowing companies to market classic-themed cars.”

Since 1967, federal law has prevented carmakers from producing turnkey vehicles that do not meet federal motor vehicle safety standards. Replica carmakers have only been able to sell brand-new cars and trucks until now by selling kits or engineless vehicles that the customer then has to finish.

However, under the Low Volume Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Act, which passed in December 2015 as part of a highway funding bill, replica carmakers would be able to sell turnkey replica vehicles that do not necessarily conform to current automotive safety standards, provided they adhere to production caps (no more than 325 vehicles per year, built by companies that construct no more than 5,000 vehicles per year worldwide), use EPA- or CARB-certified current model-year engines, and replicate vehicles at least 25 years old.

The law also mandated that the EPA and the NHTSA draft guidelines and regulations for anybody who wanted to take advantage of the law within a year of the law’s passage. While the EPA issued its draft guidelines by the end of 2017, the NHTSA didn’t do so until about eight weeks after SEMA filed its lawsuit asking a federal appellate court to compel the federal agency to act.

The recent regulation, which the NHTSA issued Friday [15 Jan 2021] and which will be enacted in the Federal Register in the coming days, addresses a number of minor issues that arose when the agency issued its draft of the regulation in December 2019. Perhaps the most significant change, according to Stuart Gosswein, SEMA’s senior director of federal government affairs, is in the agency’s definition of “resemble.”

“NHTSA started off with a more conservative approach” under which replica vehicle manufacturers would be limited to the same length, width, and height as the vehicle being replicated, Gosswein said. The draft regulation even specified that the replica vehicle’s interior would have to match the original vehicle’s interior dimensions as well. “So they’d just be building reproductions. We argued that the operative word is ‘resemble,’ not ‘duplicate,” and they agreed.”

Under the revised guidelines, interior dimensions will not be considered and replica vehicle manufacturers will be allowed a 10 percent difference in external dimensions – possibly more with the agency’s permission.

“Whether a replica motor vehicle sufficiently ‘resembles’ an original motor vehicle is a matter NHTSA will decide on an individualized basis and in its discretion, taking into account the overall appearance of the vehicle,” the agency wrote in the regulation. “To be clear, the FAST Act creates an exemption program designed to allow historic models to be replicated in a less costly way by low-volume manufacturers. NHTSA does not interpret ‘resemble’ in a manner in that would allow vehicles that are merely inspired by older vehicles to be built, or otherwise allow for artistic license to create vehicles that merely remind the public of past automotive heritage.”

 In addition, the NHTSA’s final regulation allows foreign carmakers to sell replica cars in the country via registered importers, relaxes the burden of proof on replica carmakers regarding copyrights and licenses necessary to produce the replica cars, and allows replica carmakers to purchase rolling chassis from production carmakers provided the two companies can agree to stamp VINs according to the specifications in the Low Volume Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Act.

The agency also clarified that its regulations apply only to vehicles that were originally offered for consumer sale and thus does not permit replica vehicles based on prototypes, concept cars, or show cars.

Roughly a dozen companies have expressed interest in replicating everything from Checkers to ’32 Fords to DeLoreans to Lamborghini Countaches to Shelby Cobras, though the unanticipated delays in the EPA’s and the NHTSA’s regulations – caused by bureaucratic delays and a plethora of unfilled positions at the NHTSA – led some of those companies to backburner or even cancel their plans.

“They’ve been waiting for this day so they can unpause,” Gosswein said.

The publication of the NHTSA’s regulations does not mean that replica car sales will start immediately, Gosswein said. “The rule will take effect immediately, but companies will still need to register with NHTSA, EPA, and CARB and get their proposals approved. It’ll be some months until sales begin, though there are definitely some companies – about five or six of them – with their proposals ready and waiting to submit.”

One potential remaining holdup concerns the number of drivetrains available for replica car companies to use in their vehicles. While it’s possible for low-volume manufacturers to use any EPA-certified production engine package, the law also specifies that the replica carmakers have to use a CARB-certified engine package, and at last count CARB only approved of one engine package: the 430-hp LS3 E-Rod V-8 crate engine from GM.

“The engine manufacturers were enthused when the law was enacted, but then everything got put on hold,” Gosswein said. “This is why our focus now will be on engine packages and on getting as many out there as possible for a variety of sizes and needs.”

While many of the replica carmakers Gosswein knows of are expected to power their vehicles with internal combustion engines, he said at least a couple are looking to go electric, possibly with packages like GM’s eCrate system.

For now, though, Gosswein said the major push is over and all that’s left for SEMA to do is help the various replica carmakers navigate the application process.

“We’re just eager to move forward,” he said.

20 Nov

The Morgan 3 Wheeler Is Dead, Long Live the Limited-Edition P101 (Automobile, 11/18/2020)

[What I find interesting (and somewhat scary) is that the MMC Factory Web Site shows only 3 models currently available – the M3W, the CX Plus 6 and the CX Plus 4. The announced CX Roadster and the CX 4/4 are not on the web site (I don’t know what the situation is with them) so with the M3W going away, the only cars left are the Plus 6 and Plus 4. Neither of which are likely to be coming to the US anytime soon. It makes one wonder what the dealers will sell and what’s in our future? Mark]

After a decade, the delightfully anachronistic Morgan 3 Wheeler will say its goodbyes. Morgan revived this classic form factor in 2011, which was last produced in 1952 and superseded by the long-lived 4/4 Roadster (and its derivatives). That project was known internally as P101, and so to celebrate the end of the current 3 Wheeler’s production run, the company’s whipped up a P101 limited edition model.

First, why is the 3 Wheeler ending production? For one, its V-twin engine, an X-Wedge unit produced by S&S, will have its type approval expire and it appears that it won’t be renewed. Without an engine supplier, Morgan will opt to cease production of the current iteration of the 3 Wheeler – a hint, perhaps, that a new 3 Wheeler with a different power plant might be in the future.

[The previously posted Drive article states an electric vehicle is coming?  Mark]

Now, let’s take a closer look at the limited-edition P101 model, which Morgan will limit to just 33 models. Its most prominent detail is a translucent tonneau over the passenger seat, giving the P101 a striking asymmetrical look. It has a slightly yellow hue, looking aged or perhaps like something fitted to a Golden Era race car. Adding to the asymmetry, one exhaust pipe features a white ceramic coating, the other black.

Other details are heritage-inspired, like the solid “Aero-disc” wheels and large Hella spotlights.  

[I concur, the disc wheels do look superb! Mark]

Several paint schemes are available, each celebrating a different retro theme: Belly Tank, Dazzleship, Aviator, and Race Car. It’s apparent what most are an homage to, but if you’re not familiar with World War I naval warfare, the “Dazzleship” graphics are a reference to “dazzle painting,” an early form of camouflage intended to make it difficult for enemy ships to accurately target the vessel. The treatment looked incredible—and so does the Dazzleship 3 Wheeler—although the camo’s effectiveness is debatable.

This special edition will be available in the U.S., as well as Europe, and pricing starts at £45,000 (roughly $59,500 at today’s exchange rates)in the U.K. Morgan says that “bespoke” 3 Wheelers will continue to be produced alongside the P101 editions until production ends. 

[I suspect all the dealers will have some allocation. Contact your favorite dealer if interested.  Mark]

19 Nov

Morgan Waves Goodbye to the V-Twin 3 Wheeler With Stunning P101 Edition (www.thedrive.com NOV 19, 2020)

[I deleted the photos from this article as they are the same as shown in the other article of the same topic and as posted to the MMC web site. If interested, view them there. Mark]

The 3 Wheeler will soon return in electric form, finally.

Having sold over 2,500 units since production began in 2012, The Morgan Motor Company is about to put an end to the S&S 2.0-liter V-twin-powered 3 Wheelers. However, before gearing up to produce its electric successors known so far as the EV3, Morgan will offer just 33 examples of 3 Wheeler P101s, which are celebratory special editions featuring several updated parts. These 3 Wheelers will be available in five ‘art pack’ variants, starting at £45,000 in the U.K.—the equivalent to roughly $60,000.

The Morgan Motor Company may have started out with conveniently tax-evading 3 Wheelers in 1911 following 1909’s Runabout prototype by HFS Morgan, yet the original line was discontinued after the last Ford-engined F-Series rolled out of the Malvern factory in 1952. The modern, American-engined 3 Wheeler’s story began in 2009 when Morgan engineers launched Project 101, the development program leading up to the 2011 production model. The Morgan 3 Wheeler has been mildly updated since to become a fan favorite, a unique toy, and the perfect tool to set transcontinental driving records with.

In 2021, production of the combustion-engined 3 Wheelers will come to an end with the 33 P101 editions, which all feature a single-leaf tonneau cover—first seen on Morgan’s EV3 concept in 2016—that is supposed to let everybody know that this is more of a hardcore single-seater compared to the regular 3 Wheeler grocery getters out there. Going very high-tech with composites indeed, like “on engine shrouds for 1970s race cars,” Morgan’s resin cover exhibits a natural translucent golden color.

The P101s also come with body-colored low-drag Aero disk wheels, 9-inch Hella spot lamps positioned way down to reduce turbulence around the suspension and wishbones, and alternated black and white ceramic-coated straight-cut exhausts to emphasize the asymmetric theme. Further details include torque markers on each front tire, a fly screen, additional louvers, exposed rivets, and P101 markings all around.

Additionally, Morgan’s four P101 art packs include:

The Belly Tank: Referencing liveries found on belly tank racers and “lakesters” that were inspirations for the 3 Wheeler initially, The Belly Tank graphic pack features a distressed effect in the vinyl.

The Dazzleship: The Dazzleship is the boldest of the art packs. Its striking black and white design is inspired by the graphic camouflage of period military vehicles.

The Aviator: Evoking a sense of aviation spirit, The Aviator graphic pack is an extension of similarly themed graphics currently offered on the 3 Wheeler. This art pack is inspired by nose art found on RAF planes in WWII.

The Race Car: Three-wheeled Morgan vehicles were competing in motorsport almost as soon as the first example was created. The Race Car graphic pack features stripes and roundels, paying homage to the liveries that adorned early Morgan race cars.

It’s all about those stickers, folks! Morgan says that all 33 production slots have already been allocated to Morgan dealerships in the U.K., Europe, and the United States, with production beginning immediately alongside the last bespoke 3 Wheelers in 2021.

As for the electric successor, Morgan first presented its EV3 at the 2016 Geneva Motor Show, only to delay the project severely afterward, due to switching suppliers and restarting the development process while also dealing with financial difficulties. However, the all-electric new Morgan 3 Wheeler is eminent now and will join the line of BMW-powered new Morgans in 2022.

19 Nov

MORGAN LAUNCHES NEW LIMITED-EDITION 3 WHEELER P101 TO CELEBRATE END OF MODEL’S PRODUCTION (Morgan-Motors.CO.UK, Nov 19, 2020)

The Morgan Motor Company is marking the end of production of one of its most well-loved models, the 3 Wheeler, with the announcement of the P101 edition. The 3 Wheeler — which was introduced in its current form in 2011 — will cease production in 2021, once type approval on its S&S V-twin engine finishes.

P101 stands for Project 101, the internal name given to the project to revive the 3 Wheeler when development began more than a decade ago. Limited to just 33 examples, the P101 was conceived by Morgan’s in-house Design and Engineering departments to celebrate their original project, and its resulting model success throughout its production run.

The current 3 Wheeler has been one of the company’s most popular models of all time, more than 2,500  examples having been made since its launch in 2011. The 3 Wheeler is exported to all corners of the globe, and has received countless motoring accolades from across the industry. This recognition, the popularity of the car, and the numerous ‘stand out’ road trips undertaken by owners confirms that the spirit of adventure and individuality is alive and well, both at Morgan and within the wider automotive industry.

Characterised by a purposeful and utilitarian aesthetic, the P101 features a range of unique components and bespoke detailing, many of which have been inspired by the prominent design features of Morgan’s three wheeled models.

A striking single-leaf tonneau cover – first seen on Morgan’s EV3 concept in 2016 – has been deployed to exaggerate the asymmetrical theme, and is intended for single occupant use. The composite resin cover exhibits a natural translucent golden colour, not dissimilar to materials witnessed on engine shrouds for 1970s race cars.  The tonneau is lightweight, streamlined, and honest in both its design and manufacture.

The Aero-disc wheels – painted to match the main body colour –– provide a further streamlined visual and define the look of the P101, making it instantly recognisable as a unique model. The low-drag aero-disc wheels work together with low-slung Hella 9-inch spot lamps, positioned to reduce turbulence around the suspension and wishbones, whilst also giving the car a more forward-leaning aesthetic.

Adding to the asymmetry and split identity of the P101, alternated black and white ceramic coated exhausts contrast left to right of the model. Further detailed additions include torque markers on each front tyre, straight-cut exhausts, a fly screen, additional louvres, exposed rivet details, and unique P101 markings. Together, they evoke the sense of excitement felt around the company when the original prototypes were being developed.   

Each 3 Wheeler P101 is available in Deep Black or Satin White Silver paint, with appropriate decals to suit. Further to this, four P101 art packs will be available for customers to choose from, each with their own unique identifiers and vivid graphics:

The Belly Tank – Referencing liveries found on belly tank racers and ‘lakesters’ that were inspirations for the 3 Wheeler initially, The Belly Tank graphic pack features a distressed effect in the vinyl. 

The Belly Tank

The Dazzleship – The Dazzleship – featured in the launch film and images – is the boldest of the art packs. Its striking black and white design is inspired by the graphic camouflage of period military vehicles.  

The Dazzleship

The Aviator – Evoking a sense of aviation spirit, The Aviator graphic pack is an extension of similar theme graphics offered on 3 wheelers.  Inspired by nose art found on RAF planes in WWII.

The Aviator

The Race Car – Three wheeled Morgan vehicles were competing in motorsport almost as soon as the first example was created. The Race Car graphic pack features stripes and roundels, and pays homage to the liveries which have adorned by early Morgan race cars.

The Race Car

The limited-edition P101 is priced from £45,000 plus local market taxes and on-the-road costs, and all 33 production slots have already been allocated to Morgan dealerships. Production of the model will begin immediately and continue alongside ‘bespoke’ 3 Wheelers during 2021.  

The importance of three wheelers in Morgan’s history cannot be underestimated. From the original Runabout built by HFS Morgan in 1909, through to the latest version in production today, thousands have been built in Morgan’s factory in Malvern, Worcestershire. Through various iterations, the original three wheelers were made until 1952, when the factory began exclusive production of four-wheeled cars until the launch of the 3 Wheeler in 2011. Details of a potential successor to the 3 Wheeler are yet to be announced, and while Morgan can confirm that the Morgan 3 Wheeler will return, there will be a break in production.

[More Images on MMC Web Site http://www.morgan-motors.co.uk ]

Steve Morris, Chairman & CEO, Morgan Motor Company, said: “Production of the most recent 3 Wheeler has been a thrilling and exciting chapter in Morgan’s history. The significance of the original Three Wheeler is undoubted, however the introduction of the ‘current’ 3 Wheeler in 2011 proved to Morgan, and the world, that fun cars still have a place and that the ‘why not’ attitude is sometimes best.

The P101 celebrates the raw and stripped back nature of the 3 Wheeler, and provides us with the perfect opportunity to draw an incredible chapter of Morgan’s history to a close. Once the 33 examples have been created, the opportunity for an exciting new chapter for three-wheeled Morgan vehicles begins.”

25 Oct

William Fink Memorial Service, Saturday, October 17, 2020, 12:00pm

[Folks, the Bill Fink Celebration of Life was posted on YouTube a few days ago. Simply click on the link below to watch it. Be advised, it is well over an hour long.

As many of you will remember, Bill was our honored guest at the MOGSouth 40th Anniversary Meet in Aiken, SC a few years ago. Should you want to advance the video to about the 31 minute and 20 second point, you will see and hear Tcherek’s comments. Also, at the 1 hour, 12 minute and 30 second spot, there is a clip of Bill in his shop with a two toned (cream body with burgundy wings) 4/4 in the background. I believe this was originally my 1981 4/4 before I picked it up. At least this is what Tcherek told me. Mark]

https://youtu.be/G050OhB3I1E

25 Aug

Used car buying guide: Morgan Aero 8

(https://www.autocar.co.uk/) 24 Aug 2020

First unwrapped in 2000, the Aero 8 was a modern(ish) take on Morgan’s tried-and-tested olde-worlde formula, and, despite its age, good examples can still be found

For all that the new Plus Six does to take Morgan belatedly into the 21st century, with its all-independent suspension, lightweight aluminium chassis and punchy turbocharged straight six, it doesn’t exactly advance the Malvern brand’s design language beyond, say, 1964.

That’s part of Morgan’s charm, of course, and its steadfast commitment to traditionalism is an integral component in its quiet but sustained success. So when the cross-eyed Aero 8 was unwrapped at the 2000 Geneva motor show, all bets were off.

Here was a genuine, up-to-date sports car, with a BMW V8 giving it a competitive 4.8sec 0-62mph time and promises of engaging dynamics, courtesy of new inboard shock absorbers, double-wishbone suspension and AP Racing performance brakes.

The modernisation didn’t stop there, either: niceties including air conditioning, cruise control and a heated windscreen placed the Aero 8 in another realm entirely to the brand’s existing models. Morgan being Morgan, of course, it was all still assembled around an ash wood frame, and the asymmetrical metal dashboard would look equally at home in the cockpit of a 1960s airliner. If it ain’t broke…

Just over 200 examples of this first-generation car were produced between 2000 and 2004, and they still pop up in the classifieds periodically. Its Series 2 successor, subtly restyled to comply with US safety standards and allow for a roomier cabin, packed a hefty power upgrade but was built for only a year in limited numbers, so most have been retired to private collections.

The closest the Aero 8 came to receiving what you might call a facelift was in 2005, when the Series 3 was launched with Mini headlights in place of the previous New Beetle items, giving it a more conventionally styled visage without compromising on its retro appeal.

Mechanicals were left largely untouched until the roadster entered its final form in 2007 with 362bhp from a 4.8-litre V8 that BMW kindly continued producing on a limited basis for Morgan after retiring it from its own line-up. An automatic gearbox was also made available for the first time, featuring an optional Sport mode and offering improved straight-line performance over the six-speed manual unit.

The Morgan Aero 8 has pace and kerbside status in spades, but it’s very pricey.

Later variants include the ultra-exclusive, boat-tailed AeroMax coupé and its Targa-topped Supersports sibling, the traditionally styled Plus 8 and, more recently, the Series 5 – a revived, subtly updated version of the Aero 8, produced from 2016 to 2018. The austentacious Aero GT acted as the car’s swansong, and was made in very limited numbers.

Happily, because improvements and tweaks made to the supercar over its 18-year life cycle were so subtle, choosing which version to go for is simply a matter of deciding your budget: prices for early cars begin at £40,000 (plus shipping costs if you opt to import), but you can expect to pay above £120,000 for low-mileage Series 5 cars and special editions.

How to get one in your garage

An expert’s view

Melvyn Rutter, Melvyn Rutter Ltd: “It’s a very finite market, and not that many come up for sale, because people tend to like them and drive them. Initially, there was a huge rush and Morgan couldn’t make enough. It was only the really determined who stuck with it and waited; they weren’t impulsive buyers. Like the 3 Wheeler, there were people who had never really thought about a Morgan before, and we got new people into the fold.”

Buyer beware…

Engine: The side-exit sports exhaust is a highly prized option, giving post-2004 cars a bassy growl. Both BMW-derived V8 engines are characteristically durable, but stick to their servicing schedules and shell out for genuine parts.

Body: Series 1 and 2 cars are known to suffer leaky roofs, so keep them garaged. Wooden element of the chassis means crash repairs and restoration work is a specialist job best undertaken by a Morgan dealer. Body panels, especially the bootlid, evolved over the years, so research before replacing them. Low front splitter is prone to stone chips.

Gearbox: Don’t be put off by a noisy manual gearbox. The Aero 8 features far less soundproofing than a contemporary BMW, so a degree of crunchiness and whirring is par for the course. Installing a quick-shift gearstick helps to eliminate some of the clunkiness.

Electrics: Exposed indicator wires can come disconnected, so check under the front wings if they’re playing up, and later Beetle headlights have a tendency to let water in and become misted. Series 1 cars suffered from a sticking starter motor, especially after long periods of non-use. Fit a conditioner to keep specialist gel battery in working order. Power-steering pump is a weak spot, but replacements are easily found.

Interior: Later interiors are more modern but still prone to wear if not maintained properly. Popular modifications include an aluminum steering boss and a Mota Lite steering wheel, while an upgraded stereo is a wise investment.

Also worth knowing

The manufacturer offers a full maintenance and restoration service at its Pickersleigh Road headquarters, with a fixed price servicing structure.